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ECIS ESLMT Conference Copenhagen (2-5 March, 2017)
"The Power of Multilingual Classrooms in International Education: Implications for Curriculum Design, Teaching and Learning" 

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Thursday, March 2
 

08:30

A Scaffolded Approach to Meaning Making Across the Curriculum (FULL - only for paid participants)
As students across all levels of schooling engage in learning across the curriculum, they are expected to comprehend and compose a range of complex texts of all kinds. These texts can vary from spoken texts of the teacher to the multimodal texts of their textbooks to the multiplicity of texts they have to produce in response to the tasks set for them. One response to having ESL students in the classroom is to simplify difficult texts so that they are more accessible to ESL students. In doing this, we end up limiting the capacity of those same students to comprehend and in turn compose more complex texts required by the curriculum. In this workshop, we will explore how we can support ESL students in accessing the meanings of this complex textual landscape by showing how these texts work to make meaning. We will draw on a range of complex texts from across the curriculum and show how we can open up the meaning to all students by making explicit the workings of both the language and the visuals through an explicit focus on the ‘grammars’ of both those meaning making systems. The activities suggested will be considered within the framework of a rich teaching and learning cycle that moves through four key stages: setting the context, modelling and deconstruction, joint construction and independent construction.

Schedule for the day:
8:30am: Buses pick up attendees from the Tivoli Hotel entrance. 

9:00-9:45: Arrive at CIS campus and visit the registration table, coffee available.  Tours around the new CIS campus

9:45-11:30am: Session 1 in your pre-conference room

11:30-12:00pm: Morning break with some light snack and coffee

12:00-1:30pm: Session 2

1:30-2:30pm: Lunch in the CIS Nordhavn canteen​

2:30-3:45pm: Session 3

3:45-4:00pm: Afternoon break with some dessert and coffee​

4:00-5:00pm: Session 4

5:00-6:00pm: Early evening cocktail event in the CIS canteen (free drinks and tapas) 

6:15pm: Buses pick up attendees and speakers from the CIS Nordhavn entrance.

6:45pm: Arrival back at the Tivoli Hotel


Speakers
avatar for Brian Dare

Brian Dare

Brian Dare is an international consultant in language and literacy. He is an international tutor trainer for and writer of How Language Works (HLW); Teaching ESL Learners in Mainstream Classrooms: Language in Learning across the Curriculum (TESMC: LiLaC); Literacy for Learning... Read More →


Thursday March 2, 2017 08:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen International School

08:30

Collaboration: Building on Student Assets and Teacher Assets (FULL - only for paid participants)
Collaboration is emerging as a new norm in today’s schools. When educators plan, teach and inquire together, we model the 21st century learning skills we hope to develop in our students. Participants in this session will explore how professional collaboration supports student learning, and how WIDA’s asset-based approach can enhance co-planning, co-teaching, and co-assessing to serve multilingual learners. Together we will examine the collaboration cycle through a lens of integrated language and content learning, while also connecting collaborative practices to professional learning. Participants will also be introduced to the WIDA framework and leave with tools to initiate new partnerships and deepen existing co-teaching relationships.

Schedule for the day:
8:30am: Buses pick up attendees from the Tivoli Hotel entrance. 

9:00-9:45: Arrive at CIS campus and visit the registration table, coffee available.  Tours around the new CIS campus

9:45-11:30am: Session 1 in your pre-conference room

11:30-12:00pm: Morning break with some light snack and coffee

12:00-1:30pm: Session 2

1:30-2:30pm: Lunch in the CIS Nordhavn canteen​

2:30-3:45pm: Session 3

3:45-4:00pm: Afternoon break with some dessert and coffee​

4:00-5:00pm: Session 4

5:00-6:00pm: Early evening cocktail event in the CIS canteen (free drinks and tapas) 

6:15pm: Buses pick up attendees and speakers from the CIS Nordhavn entrance.

6:45pm: Arrival back at the Tivoli Hotel

 


Speakers
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →


Thursday March 2, 2017 08:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen International School

08:30

Differentiation Strategies for ESL Students (FULL - only for paid participants)

Do you have students at many different levels of language acquisition in the same class?  Do some of them sound fluent, but struggle to comprehend complex texts or produce grade level written work? This interactive pre-conference session will provide practical strategies for differentiating content lessons and scaffolds for students at different stages of language development.  You will leave with an understanding of language acquisition and actionable steps for supporting students in content and language classes.

Objectives:

  • Experience and analyze differentiation strategies in model lessons.

  • Identify the academic language demands of texts and coursework.

  • Identify students’ strengths and language development needs for different classroom tasks and assignments.

  • Develop scaffolds and supports in each language domain (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students at different levels of language acquisition including visuals, manipulatives, graphic organizers, cooperative learning structures, and sentence frames.

    Schedule for the day:
    8:30am: Buses pick up attendees from the Tivoli Hotel entrance. 

    9:00-9:45: Arrive at CIS campus and visit the registration table, coffee available.  Tours around the new CIS campus

    9:45-11:30am: Session 1 in your pre-conference room

    11:30-12:00pm: Morning break with some light snack and coffee

    12:00-1:30pm: Session 2

    1:30-2:30pm: Lunch in the CIS Nordhavn canteen​

    2:30-3:45pm: Session 3

    3:45-4:00pm: Afternoon break with some dessert and coffee​

    4:00-5:00pm: Session 4

    5:00-6:00pm: Early evening cocktail event in the CIS canteen (free drinks and tapas) 

    6:15pm: Buses pick up attendees and speakers from the CIS Nordhavn entrance.

    6:45pm: Arrival back at the Tivoli Hotel


Speakers
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →


Thursday March 2, 2017 08:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen International School

08:30

Integrating Educational Technology with ESL Teaching (FULL - only for paid participants)
"Learning to speak another's language means taking one's place in the human community.  It means reaching out to others across cultural and linguistic boundaries.  Language is far more than a system to be explained.  It is our most important link to the world around us.  Language is culture in motion.  It is people interacting with people.” -Savignon (1983)

Effective learning is an inherently social and highly-connected process, and nowhere is that more evident than the language classroom. Technology can provide us with a powerful vehicle for connecting us and our understandings across languages. Used creatively, it can allow for significant choice and certainly amplify our individual voices. The goal of this hands-on workshop is to explore technology that will enhance your classroom learning community.  We will actively explore tools and strategies that can be used to engage and support students within a language-learning context.  This workshop is appropriate for teachers of all ages as all activities can be differentiated to work across different grade bands. As this is a hands-on, practical workshop, participants must bring a laptop or tablet that can connect to the internet."

Schedule for the day:
8:30am: Buses pick up attendees from the Tivoli Hotel entrance. 

9:00-9:45: Arrive at CIS campus and visit the registration table, coffee available.  Tours around the new CIS campus

9:45-11:30am: Session 1 in your pre-conference room

11:30-12:00pm: Morning break with some light snack and coffee

12:00-1:30pm: Session 2

1:30-2:30pm: Lunch in the CIS Nordhavn canteen​

2:30-3:45pm: Session 3

3:45-4:00pm: Afternoon break with some dessert and coffee​

4:00-5:00pm: Session 4

5:00-6:00pm: Early evening cocktail in the CIS canteen (free drinks and tapas) 

6:15pm: Buses pick up attendees and speakers from the CIS Nordhavn entrance.

6:45pm: Arrival back at the Tivoli Hotel


Speakers
avatar for Sheldon Bradshaw

Sheldon Bradshaw

Director of Technology, International School of Prague
Sheldon is a passionate believer in technology’s ability to connect us and amplify our ideas. Currently the Director of Information Technology at the International School of Prague, he has also taught in China, Indonesia, Japan and Kuwait over his 18 years in international education... Read More →


Thursday March 2, 2017 08:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen International School

08:30

Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling (TPRS/CI) (FULL - only for paid participants)

TPR Storytelling (TPRS) workshop outline:

TPR storytelling (TPRS) is a method for teaching foreign languages that has thus far been shown to be profoundly successful with students of almost all ages and all abilities. It focuses on language acquisition through Comprehensible Input. During this one-day workshop, you will acquire some Mandarin in a fun way, experience the magic of TPR storytelling, learn the 3 steps of TPR storytelling and practice some TPR storytelling strategies.  Dr. Stephen Krashen will be joining this workshop as a special guest.

Special guest: Dr. Stephen Krashen, an enthusiastic student of Mandarin.  He will have a supporting role in the presentation, commenting on TPR Storytelling practice and how it relates to current research and theory.

TPR Storytelling (TPRS) workshop includes

A Mandarin Chinese demo

Theory and research about Second Language Acquisition (SLA)

Total Physical Response (TPR)

The three steps of TPR Storytelling

TPR Storytelling teaching strategies

Schedule for the day:
8:30am: Buses pick up attendees from the Tivoli Hotel entrance. 

9:00-9:45: Arrive at CIS campus and visit the registration table, coffee available.  Tours around the new CIS campus

9:45-11:30am: Session 1 in your pre-conference room

11:30-12:00pm: Morning break with some light snack and coffee

12:00-1:30pm: Session 2

1:30-2:30pm: Lunch in the CIS Nordhavn canteen​

2:30-3:45pm: Session 3

3:45-4:00pm: Afternoon break with some dessert and coffee​

4:00-5:00pm: Session 4

5:00-6:00pm: Early evening cocktail event in the CIS canteen (free drinks and tapas) 

6:15pm: Buses pick up attendees and speakers from the CIS Nordhavn entrance.

6:45pm: Arrival back at the Tivoli Hotel

 


Speakers
avatar for Stephen Krashen

Stephen Krashen

榮譽教授 Professor Emeritus, 南加州大學 University of Southern California
Dr. Stephen Krashen, Professor Emeritus of USC (University of Southern California) has published more than 300 papers as a linguistic researcher. He is most famously known for his Theory of SLA, which includes 5 hypotheses: Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis... Read More →
avatar for Linda Li

Linda Li

Language Lab Teacher
I was born and raised in Shanghai, China. I have had the good fortune of teaching and learning for the past 20 years at various premier international schools in China, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, India and Singapore as well as an Urban high school in Denver, Colorado. I have just moved... Read More →


Thursday March 2, 2017 08:30 - 18:00
Copenhagen International School
 
Friday, March 3
 

07:00

Registration
Please go to the front entrance of the Congress Hall and register. You will also receive your name tag and free t-shirt.

Friday March 3, 2017 07:00 - 10:00
Front Entrance of the Congress Hall

08:30

Opening Session: Intro by committee, Welcome by CIS Director, Intro to Danish Culture and Language, Helle Pia Laursen (mini keynote), and Alex Rawlings (mini keynote)
Limited Capacity seats available

1. Welcome and Mentimeter Fun

2. Jennifer Weyburn (Copenhagen International School Director)  - 15 minutes

3. Tine Marie Balck Sørensen and Josefine Rosenkvist (Mother Tongue Teachers at CIS teaching Danish in Primary and Middle School ) (Intro to aspects of Danish Language and Culture) - 15 minutes
Title: "Danglish - Can I borrow the toilet?"
Abstract: A presentation about Danes and the way they speak English.
A presentation about foreigners learning Danish.
A note about our round table meeting at noon, where you can learn more about Danish at CIS + Foreign languages in Danish schools.
A note about web pages where you can explore more about the Danes - if you can't make it to the round table.

4. Helle Pia Laursen  - 30 minutes
Title: "It’s like ABC in Danish. Exploring and exploiting literacy and linguistic diversity in the classroom." 

Abstract: For multilingual children, literacy learning typically includes navigating between different signs from different written languages.The presentation will focus on possibilities of exploring and exploiting the linguistic potential in the children’s often very rich linguistic repertoires in the literacy classroom. It draws on empirical data from the longitudinal study Signs of Language, which aims to examine multilingual children’s literacy meaning making processes. Through interventions in the involved classrooms it also explores the possibilities of pedagogical transformations of the literacy practices in these classrooms to be more sensitive to the complex processes involved in multilingual children’s meaning making and script learning.

5. Alex Rawlings - 30 minutes
Title: Why You Only Really Need English

Abstract: Alex Rawlings is a polyglot from the UK who in 2012 was named the country's most multilingual student after being tested for fluency in 11 different languages. He's since gone on to learn four more, and has lived in five different countries. In this mini keynote, he is going to explain why actually, nobody really needs to learn any foreign languages at all. Because these days everybody speaks English, don’t they?

6. ESLMT Committee - 15 minutes
Topic:

Speakers
avatar for Helle Pia Laursen

Helle Pia Laursen

Department of Education, University of Aarhus
Helle Pia Laursen, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the Danish School of Education, University of Aarhus. Her main research interests include language and literacy in multilingual settings. She is a research leader of the longitudinal research project Signs of Language (2008-2017... Read More →
avatar for Alex Rawlings

Alex Rawlings

Alex was born and raised in London to a half-Greek mother and English father. As a child he spent his time between the UK, Greece and Japan, where his father worked for four years. Having always been surrounded by languages, he began to study them independently aged 14. In 2012, while... Read More →
JR

Josefine Rosenkvist

Danish and ESL teacher, Copenhagen International School
avatar for Jennifer Weyburn

Jennifer Weyburn

Director, Copenhagen International School


Friday March 3, 2017 08:30 - 10:15
Congress Hall

10:15

Morning Break
There will be a light snack during this time in the common areas next to the exhibitors.

Friday March 3, 2017 10:15 - 10:45
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

10:45

Building Knowledge About Language Through Whole School Professional Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Language is at the heart of everything we do as social beings. Education itself is a profoundly social act and
educators are increasingly aware of the critical and central role of language in teaching and learning. Many
of us working within a functional model of language have argued that understanding how language works
to make meaning is fundamental to developing both a teacher’s capacity to teach and a learner’s capacity to
learn.
One of the great challenges in taking such an approach to teaching and learning is the question of how we
can build teachers’ knowledge about how language so that they can, in turn, speed up the process by which
all students learn how to use language effectively across a range of social and educational contexts. This is
never more obvious than when we consider ESL students who are both learning a new language and
learning in that new language.
Drawing on my experiences as a teacher educator working with schools and educational systems over the
last twenty years, I will propose that the most effective way of building such teacher capacity is through
whole school professional development that aims to develop a coherent, systematic and shared language
for talking about language as a crucial part of an explicit pedagogy around language.
I will illustrate what this looks like by drawing on school contexts from around the world where such whole
school approaches have proved highly effective in improving ESL student outcomes. 

TESMC- Lexis Education 

Speakers
avatar for Brian Dare

Brian Dare

Brian Dare is an international consultant in language and literacy. He is an international tutor trainer for and writer of How Language Works (HLW); Teaching ESL Learners in Mainstream Classrooms: Language in Learning across the Curriculum (TESMC: LiLaC); Literacy for Learning... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Carstensen

10:45

Classroom Talk as a Bridge to Literacy
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This interactive workshop will illustrate the central role of spoken language in providing a bridge to literacy and academic language. Using classroom examples, we will discuss how certain kinds of talk – “literate” spoken language – can provide scaffolding for the development of academic literacies.

Speakers
avatar for Pauline Gibbons

Pauline Gibbons

Pauline Gibbons is an Adjunct Professor at the University of New South Wales Australia, where she teaches courses in teaching English as a second language. Her work with teachers has taken her to Hong Kong, Sweden, Laos, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, China, South Africa, Marshall... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Pjerrot

10:45

Inspiring Higher-order Thinking Using Level-appropriate Language
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Comprehensible Input is the key to facilitating language acquisition, and compelling input is the key to maintaining student engagement. Learn how to keep input comprehensibly compelling and how to simultaneously enhance acquisition by inspiring students to use high-order thinking skills– in the Target Language! Discover practical, yet powerful strategies that will naturally facilitate acquisition in a pleasant, engaging and impactful way, regardless of the level of the learner. Become a pro at sparking HOT using low-level/level-appropriate language!

Speakers
avatar for Carol Gaab

Carol Gaab

iFLT Director, Fluency Matters
Fluency Matters offers an expansive selection of comprehension-based readers specifically designed to facilitate acquisition. Stories are written with a manageable number of unique words, making them highly comprehensible, even to novice-level learners. We offer the widest selection... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Harlekin

10:45

Opening Boundries: A Conversation on Crosslanguage Pedagogies in Multilingual Classrooms
Limited Capacity filling up

Students in international schools have a great diversity of language and cultural backgrounds.
There has been ongoing discussion of how and how not to use and support the language
development of students who do not speak the main language of instruction, English in many
cases. Most recently, arguments have been made based on research on bilingual language
acquisition, education, and sociolinguistics to make greater use of all the linguistic resources of
students even in monolingual classrooms. In this session, we will discuss those arguments and
then consider the pros and cons of using students’ native languages during otherwise
monolingual instruction. We will describe strategies for using crosslanguage pedagogies that
optimize student learning and engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Fred Genesee

Fred Genesee

Professor Emeritus, McGill University
Fred Genesee is Professor Emeritus in the Psychology , McGill University. He has conducted extensive research on alternative forms of bilingual/ immersion education for language minority and majority students, the academic development of at-risk students in bilingual programs. language... Read More →
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Columbine

10:45

Teaching and Learning in an Interlingual / Equal Rights Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Teachers are in the frontline in our changing world. We need a pedagogical approach that is open to other languages and cultures to deal with the new realities the changing world brings.

We need leaders and teachers who are prepared to push the boundaries.

What does being prepared look like?

Participants will be introduced to the ITLGs (the Interlingual Teaching and Learning Goals). Teaching & learning are grouped together because, with the Interlingual approach, the child and the teacher become involved in a more genuine, mutual learning process where each learns from the other. Children are allowed to use their languages as cognitive tools:  they can transfer skills, concepts and learning strategies across languages. We will reflect on how schools have to change in order to implement this notion, moving from theoretical statements to effective, everyday practice.

We will also consider school / classroom / children / teacher and leader identity, and share ideas on how to plan effectively for, and put into practice ways of including home languages in everyday instruction so that all children have equal rights to the curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Lumbye

10:45

Translanguaging in the Secondary School
Limited Capacity seats available

When Second Language Students join international schools at the secondary level without well developed academic English ability, they face enormous  challenges.  Outside of their ESL classes, they are faced continually with English at a high academic level in all subject areas.

How can we help them to access the curriculum content, increase their level of understanding and at the same time show that we appreciate and value their mother tongues?

How can we give their parents insight into what their children are actually learning?

Translanguaging opens up new opportunities for students (and their parents) in the twenty-first century - but of course we will still need the ESL and mother tongue  teachers!

 

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Blomstersalen

11:45

Lunch
Friday March 3, 2017 11:45 - 13:15
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

12:30

Mid-Afternoon Consultations (by appointment only)
Consultations will occur at the allocated time and location AS WELL AS additional times TBD. Sign up and more information will be available at the Registration Desk.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →
avatar for Niki Cooper

Niki Cooper

ELL Coordinator K-12, UWCSEA Maastricht
Niki Cooper is the ELL Coordinator (K-12) at UWC Maastricht. Previous roles include Home Language Coordinator and primary school Vice-Principal. She holds a Masters in Applied Linguistics and English Language teaching. Responsible for designing and coordinating the whole school ELL... Read More →
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →
avatar for Eugenia Papadaki

Eugenia Papadaki

Founding Director, The Bilingual Schoolof Monza
Eugenia Papadaki has been the founding director of a Bilingual school for the past 21 years. She is the mother of two trilingual children from birth.She holds a B.A in Modern Foreign languages, an M.A in Applied Linguistics and a PGCE. She has taught extensively in all sectors of... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →
avatar for Antonella Sorace

Antonella Sorace

Professor of Developmental Linguistics, University of Edinburgh & BILINGUALISM MATTERS
Antonella Sorace is Professor of Developmental Linguistics at the University ofEdinburgh. She is a world leading authority in the field of bilingual languagedevelopment across the lifespan, where she brings together methods fromlinguistics, experimental psychology, and cognitive science... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Harlekin

12:30

Exhibition (Poster Sessions)
Poster presentations: posters displaying information and images of good practice will be visible throughout the conference in designated areas. Poster presenters will be available during these session times to discuss, exchange ideas and answer questions. 


Presenters:
-Mirela Dumic (IS London, Surrey)
  • Multilingual Digital Storytelling in an International Classroom: Bringing Together Mother Tongue, EAL and Art As part of the Critical Connections II project run by Goldsmiths (University of London) and the British Film Institute, this poster will showcase an interdisciplinary engagement between languages and art in the production of a Croatian-English shadow-puppet film "Stribor's Forest" at the International School of London (Surrey, UK). The aim was to promote pupils' mother tongue, literary heritage, and their learning of English as an Additional Language through digital storytelling. In this poster presentation I will show the steps in the process of our film making, with insights from Croatian pupils and the school's art teacher. This poster presentation will appeal to teachers, researchers and curriculum planners interested in interdisciplinary engagement between multilingualism, creativity and digital media in an international classroom. The film (6 min) and a short documentary about the creative process during the film making will be shown on a laptop during the poster presentation slot. The film is available on YouTube - Stribor's Forest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRxmVaXwzkI

-Dr. Jenny Feinnemann
  • This poster will present the findings of my doctoral research project which looked at the factors affecting academic language development of multilingual adolescents attending an International School. As Cummins originally pointed out the apparently well developed conversational skills of English language learners who seem to struggle in the classroom, continue to puzzle educators. My research provides a straightforward method to analyse students’ spoken language for academic elements and a system to investigate their background experiences both in English and languages other than English. Together this information helps to determine whether students may have underlying language or learning difficulties which need addressing. It is suggested these difficulties may be due to a lack of opportunities to develop academic language in any language. Demonstrations and video clips of students talking about their work will be available from the poster through the Aurasma App.

-Joan Flynn (Leysin American School)
  • Reading & Writing Workshop Considerations for multilingual, mixed-grade middle school students

-Laura Howley (The Kaust School, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)
  • This poster will show how Learning Diversity and Inclusion is tackled by my English Acquisition department. We are an English medium MYP school with Phases 2-4 English Acquisition classes. Additional in-class support is offered to these students in other subjects. The majority of our EA students are native Arabic speakers.
    Using a matrix of Prior Knowledge, Concepts, Organization and Assessment, lessons are planned accordingly. I will outline how this is done and give an example of a unit of work we are currently working on with students. I will include student work to show the various stages. Our Arabic department ran a similar unit and I will include some of the collaborative materials used which fostered understanding across the dual-languages.

- Magnuson, Paul (Leysin American School)
  • This poster will focus on creative ways to help students develop language and a love for language. This year we've developed an activity called DIY Language in preparation for developing it as a class. The purpose of the class is to introduce linguistics by helping students create their own, new, novel language. Students work together to create a lexicon and a grammar, using everything they bring to the table - all their languages, language study, and interest in how things are said. In the process we discuss how language works, how it may, or may not, affect how we think...as a culminating experience students create a skit in the language to perform for others. 

-Holly Marshburn (Anglo American School of Moscow)
  • The aim of this poster session is to share how to effectively collect evidence of student learning through anecdotal notes using Google Sheets. 

-Deborah Perrin (British School in the Netherlands Junior Schools)
  • Culture & Identity: Belonging Matters - Using the research by Professor Kathryn Riley to explore how to make sense of the global world, community and school. A project with a student leadership group: JSL International Ambassadors. (Years 5 & 6) 

-Spanbroek, Heather (International School Eindhoven)
  • This Dual Language Foundation Group shows translanguaging at it's best. The perfect collaboration between day care and school allowing a smooth transition. International Education in Eindhoven was only provided from the age of 4. Where do children go before that age? Many children enter our English speaking classrooms after attending a Dutch day care. These children may have spent their first two years in a country only hearing their mother tongue. Then after moving to the Netherlands interacting with other children in Dutch at a day care setting and then expected to transition smoothly into our English speaking classrooms once they turn 4 years of age. 

    During the past three years we have tracked the students which have attended our Dual language foundation group and it is evident that their language skills have greatly benefitted. By the end of group 1 the majority of the students have exited our EAL programme and have reached the high ability group for Dutch as a foreign language, surpassing other student who did not attend the foundation group.

    Download the Aurasma app* to see a film of our foundation group in action. (*This will only work together with the image on the poster.)


Friday March 3, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Lower Level Common Area

12:30

Job-alike
Job-alike: a facilitated discussion between people with the similar job/roles in different schools based on topics proposed to the group by the chair or participants. You can choose which discussion you would like to join on the day in the assigned venue. 


Facilitators (and notes):
-Cooper, Antonia (International School of London, London)

  • Various ESL/MT Conference sessions have addressed the importance of Mother Tongue teaching and learning to international students. If, as a result, there is now an increase in the number of schools offering MT, a discussion between MT teachers on the implications for curriculum design, teaching and learning as well as a number of other issues would be good:
    * Is there indeed an increase in the number of international schools offering MT lessons? If so what is the nature and frequency of the lessons being offered?
    *Do MT teachers in international schools see a change in the language proficiency of newly arrived students? E.g. is there still a large proportion of BICS (Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills) learners, as well as CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency) learners in their groups? How does this affect the delivery of the curriculum?
    *What would be a suitable curriculum? Should it include identity, culture, language skills…..? How, in what way, are students' culture and identity being addressed within the MT programmes? How (if at all) does this affect any prescribed assessment, if at all?


-Forde, Helen (American School of The Hague)

  • Assessment and Accountability-Language and Learning Profiles: How do we communicate about our EAL/ESL learners to their teachers? How do we establish a language and learning profile? How do we determine what accommodations should be provided for our students? How do we make sure all teachers have access to pertinent information about their students?How do we assess EAL learners? How do we work with mainstream teachers to assess students' learning? How do we report to parents?

-
Manzella, Lindsay (AIS Budapest)
  • Practices and Approaches: middle school teachers who have a role which is a combination of push-in and pull out will address these questions and more: 
  • how do you collaborate for push-in sessions? How do you make the most of push-in time? How are pull-out blocks structured and how do they connect to the core classes? 


-McCarron, Margaret (American School of Bombay)

  • Spanish teacher with an interest in ELL: this discussion will focus on the topic of how to develop a highly articulated Modern Language program that is proficiency-based.  The guiding questions include:
    --What do highly-articulated and proficiency-based mean?
    --What implications do they have for curriculum design and assessment?
    --What are the roadblocks to proficiency-based Modern Language programs?
    --What is the difference between thematic and topical units?
    --And how can teaching thematic units of curriculum support a proficiency-based program?
    --How can ELL program structures inform the development of a proficiency-based Modern Languages program?

-
Nicolaou, Andreas (International School of London)
  • For heads/chairs of EAL/ESL:
    Should we be providing EAL or CLIL instruction?
    How do you decide if a student is ready for mainstream classes?
    What kind of in-class support do you provide?
    How do you work with Mother Tongue teachers?
    How do you track progress?

-Petree, Samantha (American School of Bombay)
  • Coaching- for ESL teachers who are also instructional coaches at their school. Guiding questions will be: What is the coaching model used at your school? How does your coaching impact the teaching and learning of ELLs in content classes? How do you effectively work with content teachers to support best practices of ESL teaching?


-Stewart, Susan (International School of London, Surrey)

  •  Assessment & Accountability: Language profiling of students; How do you build up a profile of prospective/new students in order to advise on the best language choices? How do you track a student's path throughout their schooling? How do you ensure you have maximised their multilingualism in order to ensure future academic and/or social advantages?


-van Tongeren, Saskia (International School of Brussels)

  • An after-school Home Language programme in International Schools: topics include:
  • -The benefits & challenges of an after-school home language programme versus a home language programme as part of the day
  • -How will the school's curriculum be transferred to the after-school programme and vice versa?
  • -Which teaching practices and approaches will resonate best with the students?
  • -How do international schools organise a Home Language after school programme ( costs, differentiation, teaching styles and competing with less academic activities offered after school)?


Friday March 3, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Pjerrot

12:30

Round Table
Round-table: these sessions focus on discussion for educators with a common topic of interest chaired by an expert or practitioner, and based on the chair's or participants' guiding questions. You can choose which discussion you would like to join on the day in the assigned venue.


Discussion leaders (and notes):

-Bekhechi, Frances with Bourke, Veronica (International School of Brussels)
  • Practices and Approaches: Looking at case studies of second language students who struggle and determining how best to support their learning.

-
Caputo, Lorna (IS Zug & Luzern, Switzerland)
  • International schools have significant populations of multilingual children with complex language and educational histories due to families’ often-frequent relocations. This round table will explore some of the unique characteristics of high socio-economic, transient, multilingual children by posing discussion questions that come from recent sociolinguistic research on language variation and exposure, as well as psycho- and clinical-linguistic research. We will discuss how international educators work with families and clinicians to diagnose language disorders in multilingual children, as well as highlight the various factors that can contribute to both over-and under-identification of language disorders in this group. In addition, we will analyse the role of teachers in supporting the needs of multilingual children with suspected language disorders, and the many professional challenges they face. Many of the speakers you have selected for the conference have researched or recently presented papers and published articles on topics that deal with multilingualism and language development. I believe that a round table that addresses multilingual children and the topic of language disorder identification and support will provide attendees with a forum to reflect on this nuanced issue. 

-Comiskey, Courtenay with Anna Kmiec, Matthew Lane, Frank Valero & Alana Riess (Leipzig International School)
  • Accessing the curriculum, valuing Mother Tongue and inclusivity: how do we work together to include English language learners from day one? The EAL team at Leipzig International School has implemented a collaboration and co-teaching model in which EAL and classroom teachers collaborate in and out of the classroom to support English learners. In this roundtable discussion we are interested in sharing ideas related to this teaching model, in particular: How do you get started and how does the model evolve? What does this model look like in and out of the classroom? What challenges and benefits are presented? And most importantly, how does it support the creation of multilingual classrooms and guide teaching and learning?  

-Kan, Christopher (Bavarian International School)
  • Who said learning shouldn't be fun? A lower affective filter, often an aspect of fun activities, can promoto learning (Krashen, 1981).The aim of my session is to explore different experiential learning activities that are not only effective for supporting EAL students but are also fun. I hope to share a few ideas, engage my participants in thinking of ways to improve and adapt these ideas for their own teaching contexts.

-Papadaki, Eugenia (The Bilingual School of Monza)
  • Parent education: parents as partners and supporters of multilingual
    education- how can we trigger off their interest and support?
  • Through this discussion we are going to create a forum for sharing different
    parent education programs which help parents develop an understanding
    of the values of multilingualism and home languages maintenance.
    How can we, as educators, actively engage parents in the development of
    multilingualism both at home level and within the school community.
    The journey of the Bilingual School of Monza towards meeting such a goal
    will be shared and some concrete examples of “parents as advocates of
    multilingualism” will serve as evidence.

-Rosenkvist, Josefine with Tine Balck Sørensen (Copenhagen International School)
  • This discussion will focus on:
  • the Danish program at CIS:
    • Danish A and Danish as a second language
  • How do teachers integrate Mother Tongue at CIS
  • English as a second Language in Danish schools

- Schmitt, Jennifer (Inter-Community School Zurich)
  • A practical session on ICSZ's model of integrated EAL support in the Early Years/Kindergarten. This discussion will explore our school’s Reggio/PYP model in the Early Years, and the way EAL support functions as an integral part of the classroom experience through collaborative co-teaching models and inclusive practice.  Participants would be encouraged to share their experiences/questions/etc. See support material/PPT here.

-Smith, Graham (The EAL Academy)
  • Assessment & accountability: this discussion will focus on promoting raising the achievement of bilingual learners through:
    -the power of formative and summative assessment to provoke positive teacher conversation about learners and pedagogy
    -the power of accountability measures (such as inspection and performance data) to raise expectations of achievement for bilingual learners 



Friday March 3, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Columbine

13:15

Transition
Friday March 3, 2017 13:15 - 13:30
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

13:30

Literacy Initiative Designed to Bring Multiliteracies and a Sense of Identity Into Elementary Classrooms
Limited Capacity filling up

As a highly diverse and multicultural international school with 80% non-native English speaking students and a robust Mother Tongue program, NIST introduced a literacy initiative designed to bring multiliteracies and a sense of identity into our elementary classrooms through the lens of reading and writing. With the support of a Literacy Coach and visiting experts, we reviewed our current practice from Early Years to Year 6 and found opportunities for translanguaging, identity mapping, and exploring culturally relevant texts that offer mirrors, windows, and doors for children to see themselves in the world around them. By redesigning our approach to reading and writing workshop, we systematically uncovered the cultural and linguistic assets that our multilingual students bring to the classroom, making the learning experience more authentic and responsive for all students.The success of this project relied on the successful collaboration between homeroom and specialist teachers, school leadership and our parent community.



Moderators
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sara K. Ahmed

Sara K. Ahmed

Elementary Literacy Coach, NIST International School
Literacy CoachNIST International
avatar for Beth Queeney-Dressler

Beth Queeney-Dressler

Deputy Head of Elementary/PYP Coordinator, NIST International School
avatar for Kristen Simmers

Kristen Simmers

EAL Team Leader, NIST Bangkok
Homeroom, EAL and Learning Support teacher specializing in language acquisition and with a growing interest in Mind, Brain, Health Education.


Friday March 3, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Pjerrot

13:30

2 Affirming Identity: Targeted Co-planning for Student Success
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusive learning requires a proverbial village of human resources, and managing expectations together can be overwhelming, especially when time is scarce.  Our support team looked into different aspects of co-planning to support inclusive learning for our diverse student population. Using input from multiple sources, we developed a discussion template to use during co-planning sessions with content teams. Our goal was to promote deep discussion about accessible teaching and learning in content areas. This approach aims to build teaching capacity through collaboration by employing a consistent structured approach to meeting students’ learning needs for academic success.

Moderators
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →

Speakers

Friday March 3, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Lumbye

13:30

Developing International-Mindedness in the Early Years
Limited Capacity seats available

My presentation is geared towards ESL and Homeroom teachers. It is based on my successful practices with the children ages 3-6, which will be profiled in my contribution to the new edition of the book by Prof. Roma Chumak-Horbatch "Linguistically Appropriate Practices" and who will also present at the ECIS ESLMT Conference in Copenhagen in 2017. I hope that after my presentation, the teachers will take to their schools and start implementing many different strategies to welcome their multicultural and multilingual students, celebrate their cultures and enrich their learning.


Moderators
avatar for Roma Chumak Horbatsch

Roma Chumak Horbatsch

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
Dr. Roma Chumak-Horbatsch is Associate Professor in the School of Early Childhood Studies at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, where she teaches courses in language development, cognitive development and childhood bilingualism. She has a background in applied linguistics and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Helen Werner

Helen Werner

Early Years, ESL, Spanish, BHMS
Until recently, I was an Early Years teacher at international schools in Germany. Now I am teaching ESL and Spanish at the Business and Hotel Management School in Switzerland, where I moved with my family. I am proud to be a global citizen and a passionate IB teacher, who speaks five... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Columbine

13:30

Expanding Your MT Definition: Bringing Identity Language Into Your School.
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

The time of English only classrooms is long over. After welcoming children’s mother tongues into classrooms, it is now time to welcome the whole child into your classroom! Today's world and the children who live in it don’t always have a black and white, easy-to-define language profile anymore. For after school MT programmes, often your passport or the languages your parents speak are your criteria for entrance into these programs. As the international community becomes more global, and more people come to live outside their national boundaries for extended periods, our children's languages and identities expand further and change. Children’s core identities are becoming more complex and their language backgrounds more diverse.

In response to a growing urgency within our school, we felt that our access criteria to MT programmes no longer met the needs of our international students and their families. As we have been spreading beyond EAL settings, trying to drive mother tongue inclusion further into the curriculum, we felt a change to our MT definition was unavoidable. We would like to share our experiences with you on adapting policies to include the whole child and everything they bring into our school. Affirming identity is one of the most crucial aspects needed to impact student learning, giving them the opportunity to be successful people with strong sense of themselves and where they come from. Let’s match our languages programmes to our international students and their lived experiences, which exist beyond the borders of their passport and not the other way around.

This policy shift will be explored through an examination of student case studies and the restructuring of our MT language programmes. Using our newly created language portrait as a flexible tool to uncover our students’ language backgrounds, we are better able to utilise their linguistic potential in all learning contexts.

Moderators
avatar for Jim Cummins

Jim Cummins

Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto
Jim Cummins is a Professor Emeritus at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. His research focuses on literacy development in educational contexts characterized by linguistic diversity. In numerous articles and books he has explored the nature... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mindy McCracken

Mindy McCracken

Mother Tongue and Identity Language Leader/EAL Teacher, International School of the Hague
Mindy holds a degree in Environmental Studies and a Multiple Subject Teaching credential with a built-in CLAD (Cross-Cultural, Language and Academic Development) concentration to support second language learners. This specific expertise has been essential for her successful classroom... Read More →
avatar for Lara Rikers

Lara Rikers

Primary School EAL Leader & Y3 EAL Teacher, International School of The Hague
Lara Rikers is an experienced Primary School Teacher and EAL Team Leader. With over fifteen years of teaching, in both Dutch and International settings, Lara actively uses her multilingual background to accelerate the language learning of her students. In her role as EAL Team Leader... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Harlekin

13:30

Innovative Use of Home Languages in the Multilingual Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

In this visual and interactive talk Joris Van den Bosch, a secondary EAL teacher from the British School of Brussels, will present to you a wide range of his student-approved original classroom activities across the different language skills and subjects in which home languages are used to enhance academic word acquisition and general English language learning. These will be applicable to any ESL/EAL and mainstream classroom even if the teacher does not have a language in common with her or his students.  He would like all teachers to adopt some of these L1 activities, and material writers to start including them in teacher guides and resource books. Not only will this benefit students’ language development, it will enhance your learners’ self-esteem, enabling them to feel valued and to see themselves as linguistically talented.

Please find examples of my L1 activities on: https://joriseal.wordpress.com/


Moderators
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joris Van den Bosch

Joris Van den Bosch

Secondary EAL teacher, The British School of Brussels


Friday March 3, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Carstensen

13:30

Upper Elementary/Middle School Students and Role of Parents (book club)
Limited Capacity seats available

The role of parent participation has been underscored in education research and teachers are actively encouraged to make connections with parents.  I'll share the organization strategies for an interactive bookclub involving parents as well as discuss how to prepare for the collaborative relationship opportunity that results when parents are active participants.  An outcome of the project has been the creation of three different book clubs (in the children's mother tongue) lead by the parents who participated in the initial book club.



Moderators
avatar for Sheldon Bradshaw

Sheldon Bradshaw

Director of Technology, International School of Prague
Sheldon is a passionate believer in technology’s ability to connect us and amplify our ideas. Currently the Director of Information Technology at the International School of Prague, he has also taught in China, Indonesia, Japan and Kuwait over his 18 years in international education... Read More →

Speakers
JN

Juana Nolasco

ES ELL Teacher, Cairo American COllege


Friday March 3, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Blomstersalen

14:30

Afternoon Break
Friday March 3, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

15:00

Home Language Integration: Our Journey's Highlights and Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

'I love all the different cultures and languages at our school!' If you have said this before, what are you actually doing about it in your classroom and school? By not incorporting home language opportunities in the classroom and school, we feel that we are contributing to the devaluing of multilingualism.
  • Facilitating home language use in the classroom lays the foundation of aquisition of other languages.
  • Home language acquisition is linked to cultural identity. 
  • Schools can play a significant role in the prevention of home language loss.
This presentation will talk about our home language journey in our own upper primary classrooms and at Copenhagen International School as a whole. We will show many examples (videos, student work, parent communication, video interviews, etc.) that we have collected on this journey. Our hope is that our participants will be able to connect to our work and also take away some good ideas to use at your school. 

'The small classroom decisions that we make impact the greater community.'

Speakers
avatar for Ron Rosenow

Ron Rosenow

Upper Primary EAL Teacher, Copenhagen International School
Ron Rosenow has a Masters Degree in Second Languages and Cultures and also a BA Degree in Spanish and Linguistics (both from the University of Minnesota, USA). He specializes in teaching EAL students at the elementary level. After teaching for six years at various schools in Minnesota... Read More →
avatar for Karen Serritslev

Karen Serritslev

PYP Coodinator, Copenhagen International School
An experienced classroom teacher, IB PYP workshop leader and now PYP coordinator, Karen started her international teaching career when she moved from Australia to Denmark in 2005. Her teaching pedagogy is centred on a constructivist, inquiry-based model and she enjoys integrating... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Harlekin

15:00

Literacy Engagement and Identity Texts in the Multilingual Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

Most educators and policy-makers are intuitively aware that it is important to develop a strong culture of reading among our students—what Frank Smith called “Joining the Literacy Club”. This is often challenging when students are learning through a second (or third) language and in the process of catching up academically with their native-speaking peers. However, when we realize just how overwhelming the research evidence is regarding the crucial importance of literacy engagement for academic development, it brings an urgency to the need for schools to develop explicit policies regarding the promotion of literacy engagement for all learners. The workshop will engage participants in sharing ideas about how to develop school-based language policies, drawing on the concept of identity texts as a tool to enable students to take ownership of their own dual language literacy development in ways that include both receptive processes (e.g., reading, video viewing, etc.) and productive processes (e.g., writing, video creation, etc.).

Speakers
avatar for Jim Cummins

Jim Cummins

Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto
Jim Cummins is a Professor Emeritus at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. His research focuses on literacy development in educational contexts characterized by linguistic diversity. In numerous articles and books he has explored the nature... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Carstensen

15:00

Multilingualism Across the Lifespan: Language, Cognition, and Practical Implications
Limited Capacity seats available

There is a strong scientific and economic case for encouraging
multilingualism in Europe, in two respects. First and most obviously, there is
considerable evidence highlighting the benefits to individuals, business,
culture and the economy of being able to communicate freely with people
from other countries in their languages and to understand local
cultures. Second, and less obviously, individuals and societies benefit from
multilingualism irrespective of which languages are involved, since a
multilingual brain potentially operates more effectively in terms of focusing,
seeing both sides of an argument, and flexibly adapting to changing
circumstances. Investing in multilingualism will thus enhance the
capabilities of individuals and groups and improve a country's ability to
compete globally. However, enabling multilingualism, both at the individual
and at the societal level, is not without challenges. I will discuss some of the
work that the Bilingualism Matters centre does - in the UK and
internationally - to bridge the gap between research and educators, teachers,
and policy makers, and to implement language learning programmes based
on informed professional decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Antonella Sorace

Antonella Sorace

Professor of Developmental Linguistics, University of Edinburgh & BILINGUALISM MATTERS
Antonella Sorace is Professor of Developmental Linguistics at the University ofEdinburgh. She is a world leading authority in the field of bilingual languagedevelopment across the lifespan, where she brings together methods fromlinguistics, experimental psychology, and cognitive science... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Columbine

15:00

Multilingualism for All: What About At-Risk Learners?
Limited Capacity seats available

While there is ample evidence for the advantages of bi/multilingualism for typically-developing learners, parents and educators often express doubts about bilingualism and educating children with learning challenges in a second language. There is a growing body of research on the development of children with learning disabilities, including children with language and reading impairment, Down Syndrome, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Reading and language learning difficulties are the most common challenges faced by at-risk school age learners. Strategies and approaches for identifying and working with students who are at-risk for reading and/or language impairment and are learning through a second language will be discussed.  

Speakers
avatar for Fred Genesee

Fred Genesee

Professor Emeritus, McGill University
Fred Genesee is Professor Emeritus in the Psychology , McGill University. He has conducted extensive research on alternative forms of bilingual/ immersion education for language minority and majority students, the academic development of at-risk students in bilingual programs. language... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Lumbye

15:00

Promoting and Assessing the Linguistic and Cultural Identity of Young Multilingual Learners strand: culture and identity
Limited Capacity seats available

Identity development is a core feature of the cross-cultural competency that dual language programs aim to promote, but guidance is lacking about how to realize this goal, particularly with our youngest learners. Drawing from an ethnographic study of a kindergarten classroom in a Spanish-English dual language program in Costa Rica, this presentation will highlight strategies for promoting and assessing identity development. Participants will leave the session with concrete instructional strategies that teachers can use to promote cross-cultural competence and identity development, as well as developmentally appropriate tasks designed to investigate these constructs with young learners.

Speakers
avatar for Liz Howard

Liz Howard

Associate Professor, University of Connecticut
Elizabeth R. Howard is an associate professor of bilingual education in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut, where she teaches graduate courses on linguistic and cultural diversity and conducts research focusing on dual language education, biliteracy development... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Blomstersalen

15:00

Training Teachers to Identify and Explicitly Teach Academic Language
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This workshop describes a professional development program for teachers to analyze texts and classroom tasks in order to determine the academic language students need to study a subject. Using science as a sample subject, the participants will work through relevant texts and tasks and explore possible techniques for the classroom that can build scientific language among students.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Deborah Short

Dr. Deborah Short

Academic Language Research & Training
Deborah J. Short, PhD, directs Academic Language Research & Training, LLC and provides professional development on academic literacy, content­-based ESL, and sheltered instruction worldwide. Formerly she was a division director at the Center for Applied Linguistics where she co-developed... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Pjerrot

16:00

Transition
Friday March 3, 2017 16:00 - 16:10
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

16:10

Self-Selected Free Voluntary Reading: The Missing Link in Language Education.
Limited Capacity seats available

Our goal in language education is no longer simply to help students acquire conversational language; We now aim at developing higher levels of competence, competence that will allow acquirers to use their languages in specialized areas, such as higher education, international relations and business, science, and journalism. With increased communication throughout the planet, high levels of competence in a variety of languages is now essential in many fields.Thus far, language educators have used two means of achieving higher levels of competence in second languages: direct instruction in the grammar, vocabulary and discourse of specialized language, and content-based language ("sheltered) teaching.There is a third possibility that has not been exploited that appears to be the most powerful path of all: Self-selected reading. Evidence is accumulating showing that self-selected reading leads to high levels in nearly all aspects of language: reading, vocabulary, writing, and grammar, and is far more effective and efficient than direct instruction. Readers also know more in a variety of areas and develop "habits of mind" that contribute to career success.I present a stage hypothesis, suggesting that successful acquisition of academic/specialized language happens in two stages: A stage of self-selected "lighter" reading, which builds the foundation for the next stage, reading in one's area of interest.I briefly present evidence from method comparison studies, multivariate studies, and case histories supporting these generalizations, and suggestions for incorporating self-selected reading in classrooms.For reading to play this role in a variety of languages, however, students need access to reading material in these languages.  We clearly need to invest more in libraries, physical and virtual.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Krashen

Stephen Krashen

榮譽教授 Professor Emeritus, 南加州大學 University of Southern California
Dr. Stephen Krashen, Professor Emeritus of USC (University of Southern California) has published more than 300 papers as a linguistic researcher. He is most famously known for his Theory of SLA, which includes 5 hypotheses: Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 16:10 - 17:10
Congress Hall

17:10

End of the day Plenary
Friday March 3, 2017 17:10 - 17:30
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

17:30

Afternoon Consultations (by appointment only)
Consultations will occur at the allocated time and location AS WELL AS additional times TBD. Sign up and more information will be available at the Registration Desk.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →
avatar for Niki Cooper

Niki Cooper

ELL Coordinator K-12, UWCSEA Maastricht
Niki Cooper is the ELL Coordinator (K-12) at UWC Maastricht. Previous roles include Home Language Coordinator and primary school Vice-Principal. She holds a Masters in Applied Linguistics and English Language teaching. Responsible for designing and coordinating the whole school ELL... Read More →
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Paul Magnuson

Paul Magnuson

Director of Research and Curriculum, Leysin American School
Paul is the Director of Research and Curriculum at Leysin American School in Switzerland. In addition, he oversees LASER (LAS Educational Research) as well as the newly launched Middle School program. Paul is deeply interested in student-centered, self-regulated learning via an Agile... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →
avatar for Eugenia Papadaki

Eugenia Papadaki

Founding Director, The Bilingual Schoolof Monza
Eugenia Papadaki has been the founding director of a Bilingual school for the past 21 years. She is the mother of two trilingual children from birth.She holds a B.A in Modern Foreign languages, an M.A in Applied Linguistics and a PGCE. She has taught extensively in all sectors of... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →
avatar for Antonella Sorace

Antonella Sorace

Professor of Developmental Linguistics, University of Edinburgh & BILINGUALISM MATTERS
Antonella Sorace is Professor of Developmental Linguistics at the University ofEdinburgh. She is a world leading authority in the field of bilingual languagedevelopment across the lifespan, where she brings together methods fromlinguistics, experimental psychology, and cognitive science... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 17:30 - 18:30
Harlekin
 
Saturday, March 4
 

07:30

08:30

Morning Consultations (by appointment only)
Consultations will occur at the allocated time and location AS WELL AS additional times TBD. Sign up and more information will be available at the Registration Desk.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →
avatar for Niki Cooper

Niki Cooper

ELL Coordinator K-12, UWCSEA Maastricht
Niki Cooper is the ELL Coordinator (K-12) at UWC Maastricht. Previous roles include Home Language Coordinator and primary school Vice-Principal. She holds a Masters in Applied Linguistics and English Language teaching. Responsible for designing and coordinating the whole school ELL... Read More →
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →
avatar for Eugenia Papadaki

Eugenia Papadaki

Founding Director, The Bilingual Schoolof Monza
Eugenia Papadaki has been the founding director of a Bilingual school for the past 21 years. She is the mother of two trilingual children from birth.She holds a B.A in Modern Foreign languages, an M.A in Applied Linguistics and a PGCE. She has taught extensively in all sectors of... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →
avatar for Antonella Sorace

Antonella Sorace

Professor of Developmental Linguistics, University of Edinburgh & BILINGUALISM MATTERS
Antonella Sorace is Professor of Developmental Linguistics at the University ofEdinburgh. She is a world leading authority in the field of bilingual languagedevelopment across the lifespan, where she brings together methods fromlinguistics, experimental psychology, and cognitive science... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 08:30 - 09:00
Harlekin

09:00

The Power of Assessment in Facilitating Language Development in the Multilingual Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

This keynote presentation will consider the role of assessment in facilitating or hindering language development in the multilingual classroom. Using writing assessment as an example, I will discuss how well-intended attempts to use assessment to encourage learning could actually be discouraging learning. I will then suggest strategies for incorporating language assessment in ways that encourage positive learning behaviour.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Kei Matsuda

Paul Kei Matsuda

Professor of English, Arizona State University
Paul Kei Matsuda is Professor of English and Director of Second Language Writing at Arizona State University, where he works closely with doctoral students specializing in second language writing from various disciplinary perspectives. Paul is Founding Chair of the Symposium on... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 09:00 - 10:15
Congress Hall

10:15

Morning Break
There will be a light snack during this time in the common areas next to the exhibitors.

Saturday March 4, 2017 10:15 - 10:45
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

10:45

Breakout session Sergio, Antonia and Elina
Limited Capacity seats available

The Power of a Fully Integrated Mother Tongue Programme

In this presentation we will share our school's Mother Tongue practices developed over 40 years at the International School of London. They are guided by a strong commitment to support students' mother tongues, their cultural and identity perceptions and international-mindedness, so as to help students function in and create a better world.

Session goals:

We shall share with our fellow-educators some of the main arguments in favour of a Mother Tongue programme which is fully integrated into the mainstream curriculum. We will show how the centrality of the Mother Tongue programme has had a strong influence on the whole school direction, ethos and recruitment. Also how globalism is presently impacting our multilingual classrooms.

 


Speakers
avatar for Elina Aavikko

Elina Aavikko

MT Coordinator, International School of London
Elina Aavikko studied Finnish language and literature in Helsinki, Finland. She completed a BA, MA and PGCE at the University of Helsinki and has been working in the International School of London, London as a Finnish teacher of primary, secondary and IB Diploma since 2008. She currently... Read More →
avatar for Sergio Pawel

Sergio Pawel

Chief Academic Officer, ISL Group
DR SERGIO PAWEL -CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER Sergio Pawel has 35 years of experience in national and international education in the UK, Latin America and Middle East. With an MSc in Nuclear Physics, MPhil in Philosophy of Science and PhD in Education, Sergio Pawel participated in the... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Blomstersalen

10:45

Conversations on Assessment and Language Development in the Multilingual Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive breakout session provides opportunities for the audience to ask questions based on the keynote presentation and to extend the conversation about assessment and language development in the multilingual classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Kei Matsuda

Paul Kei Matsuda

Professor of English, Arizona State University
Paul Kei Matsuda is Professor of English and Director of Second Language Writing at Arizona State University, where he works closely with doctoral students specializing in second language writing from various disciplinary perspectives. Paul is Founding Chair of the Symposium on... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Pjerrot

10:45

Keeping Multilingualism Alive in Your Classroom: Come and Share!
Limited Capacity seats available

In this sharing session teachers of young children will have the opportunity to discuss and share their adoption and implementation of multilingual pedagogy. Discussion topics will include successes and challenges of opening classroom doors to children’s home languages, embracing English-plus teaching, children as language teachers, moving beyond the one-time multilingual activity trap, partnering with non English-speaking families and keeping multilingualism alive.


Speakers
avatar for Roma Chumak Horbatsch

Roma Chumak Horbatsch

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
Dr. Roma Chumak-Horbatsch is Associate Professor in the School of Early Childhood Studies at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, where she teaches courses in language development, cognitive development and childhood bilingualism. She has a background in applied linguistics and... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Harlekin

10:45

Teaching in Tandem: Fostering Connections across Languages of Instruction strand: Leadership and Professional Development
Limited Capacity seats available

In many dual language programs, instruction in the two languages is provided by different teachers, thus requiring close coordination. This expectation provides teachers with an opportunity to ‘walk the walk’ of the third goal of cross-cultural competence by learning to work effectively with someone else who may have a very different work style and/or communication style. Grounded in the Guiding Principles for Dual Language Education, this presentation provides strategies and materials to help coordinate instruction in six domains: classroom management and organization, literacy instruction, content instruction, assessment, parent communication, and logistics and planning.



Speakers
avatar for Liz Howard

Liz Howard

Associate Professor, University of Connecticut
Elizabeth R. Howard is an associate professor of bilingual education in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut, where she teaches graduate courses on linguistic and cultural diversity and conducts research focusing on dual language education, biliteracy development... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Columbine

10:45

Using Pop Up Theory to Help Students Understand How Language is (and is Not) Acquired.
Limited Capacity seats available

Targeted Audience:
1. language teachers and administrators of second/foreign language programs at the middle school, high school university and adult education level
2. researchers in language teaching and language acquisition

Abstract: There is good reason to introduce students to theory, that is to understand the current state of knowledge about how language is acquired. It will help students understand why we teach the way we do, and will guide them in continuing to improve on their own after they leave us. In this session, we will focus on "Pop up theory", brief statements about how language is (and is not) acquired, used as a classroom management tool. These kinds of brief statements and reminders may be necessary: Because of the widespread use of skill- building in society, and its acceptance as an axiom in education, it is hard to set aside.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Krashen

Stephen Krashen

榮譽教授 Professor Emeritus, 南加州大學 University of Southern California
Dr. Stephen Krashen, Professor Emeritus of USC (University of Southern California) has published more than 300 papers as a linguistic researcher. He is most famously known for his Theory of SLA, which includes 5 hypotheses: Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis... Read More →
avatar for Linda Li

Linda Li

Language Lab Teacher
I was born and raised in Shanghai, China. I have had the good fortune of teaching and learning for the past 20 years at various premier international schools in China, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, India and Singapore as well as an Urban high school in Denver, Colorado. I have just moved... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Carstensen

10:45

Visible Thinking Routines for Multilingual Learners
Limited Capacity filling up

Multilingual students have vast funds of knowledge, experience, and ideas.
Visible Thinking Routines from Harvard Project Zero can support students in making their
thinking visible as well as develop their oral and written language skills in their mother
tongue and the languages of instruction. These practical strategies help students at
different levels of language proficiency express their understanding. Come experience at
least four different Visible Thinking Routines and learn how to apply them with students at
different language acquisition levels and in different grade levels.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Lumbye

11:45

Lunch
Saturday March 4, 2017 11:45 - 13:15
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

12:30

Mid-Afternoon Consultations (by appointment only)
Consultations will occur at the allocated time and location AS WELL AS additional times TBD. Sign up and more information will be available at the Registration Desk.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →
avatar for Niki Cooper

Niki Cooper

ELL Coordinator K-12, UWCSEA Maastricht
Niki Cooper is the ELL Coordinator (K-12) at UWC Maastricht. Previous roles include Home Language Coordinator and primary school Vice-Principal. She holds a Masters in Applied Linguistics and English Language teaching. Responsible for designing and coordinating the whole school ELL... Read More →
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →
avatar for Eugenia Papadaki

Eugenia Papadaki

Founding Director, The Bilingual Schoolof Monza
Eugenia Papadaki has been the founding director of a Bilingual school for the past 21 years. She is the mother of two trilingual children from birth.She holds a B.A in Modern Foreign languages, an M.A in Applied Linguistics and a PGCE. She has taught extensively in all sectors of... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →
avatar for Antonella Sorace

Antonella Sorace

Professor of Developmental Linguistics, University of Edinburgh & BILINGUALISM MATTERS
Antonella Sorace is Professor of Developmental Linguistics at the University ofEdinburgh. She is a world leading authority in the field of bilingual languagedevelopment across the lifespan, where she brings together methods fromlinguistics, experimental psychology, and cognitive science... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Harlekin

12:30

Exhibition (Poster Sessions)
Poster presentations: posters displaying information and images of good practice will be visible throughout the conference in designated areas. Poster presenters will be available during these session times to discuss, exchange ideas and answer questions. 


Presenters:

-Fatima Abdulkazem (Rabat American School)
  • A "lively" Arabic Inquiry approach: this poster highlights our "lively" Arabic approach this year. We are trying to introduce Arabic to our diverse 1st and 2nd grade RAS children. Keeping an Inquiry framework, we want the learner to make real life connections, be invited to something enjoyable, investigate with another learner, then take action individually.We will showcase examples from lively units we created from students' connections and real life experiences.

-Joan Flynn (Leysin American School)
  • Reading & Writing Workshop Considerations for multilingual, mixed-grade middle school students

-Laura Howley (The Kaust School, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)
  • This poster will show how Learning Diversity and Inclusion is tackled by my English Acquisition department. We are an English medium MYP school with Phases 2-4 English Acquisition classes. Additional in-class support is offered to these students in other subjects. The majority of our EA students are native Arabic speakers.
    Using a matrix of Prior Knowledge, Concepts, Organization and Assessment, lessons are planned accordingly. I will outline how this is done and give an example of a unit of work we are currently working on with students. I will include student work to show the various stages. Our Arabic department ran a similar unit and I will include some of the collaborative materials used which fostered understanding across the dual-languages. 

-Manzella, Lindsay (American International School of Budapest)
  • This poster presentation relates to the sub-theme "Practices and Approaches." The aim would be to show how adding overarching language objectives to a content area unit can help to enrich the unit and elevate the academic language of all students (not just ELLs). The poster would show the unit's language objectives organized around the content objectives, supporting documents for each language objective (student and teacher references), and student work. The unit plan cover page is on this link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1JzcOA9yIROgWtRkGVAhVekYG7x6pdduPRoBPtIwVi2s/edit Each language objective (in red) links to a "Language Target" with additional information and scaffolds about the language target.

-Holly Moshburn (Anglo American School of Moscow)
  • The aim of this poster session is to share how to effectively collect evidence of student learning through anecdotal notes using Google Sheets. 

-Deborah Perrin (British School in the Netherlands Junior Schools)
  • Culture & Identity: Belonging Matters - Using the research by Professor Kathryn Riley to explore how to make sense of the global world, community and school. A project with a student leadership group: JSL International Ambassadors. (Years 5 & 6) 




Saturday March 4, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Lower Level Common Area

12:30

Job-alike
Job-alike: a facilitated discussion between people with the similar job/roles in different schools based on topics proposed to the group by the chair or participants. You can choose which discussion you would like to join on the day in the assigned venue. 


Facilitators (and notes):
-Cooper, Antonia (International School of London, London)

  • Various ESL/MT Conference sessions have addressed the importance of Mother Tongue teaching and learning to international students. If, as a result, there is now an increase in the number of schools offering MT, a discussion between MT teachers on the implications for curriculum design, teaching and learning as well as a number of other issues would be good:
    * Is there indeed an increase in the number of international schools offering MT lessons? If so what is the nature and frequency of the lessons being offered?
    *Do MT teachers in international schools see a change in the language proficiency of newly arrived students? E.g. is there still a large proportion of BICS (Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills) learners, as well as CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency) learners in their groups? How does this affect the delivery of the curriculum?
    *What would be a suitable curriculum? Should it include identity, culture, language skills…..? How, in what way, are students' culture and identity being addressed within the MT programmes? How (if at all) does this affect any prescribed assessment, if at all?


-Forde, Helen (American School of The Hague)

  • Assessment and Accountability-Language and Learning Profiles: How do we communicate about our EAL/ESL learners to their teachers? How do we establish a language and learning profile? How do we determine what accommodations should be provided for our students? How do we make sure all teachers have access to pertinent information about their students?How do we assess EAL learners? How do we work with mainstream teachers to assess students' learning? How do we report to parents?

Langford, Mary with Gracia Lockwood (International Language and Literature Teachers' Cooperative- Langford International Educational Consultancy Ltd.)
  • In connection with Culture and Identity as well as Practices and Approaches, this discussion will address how Language Coordinators facilitate IB SSST Literature (SL) particularly for minority language speakers.

-
Magnuson, Paul (Leysin American School)
  • Research as professional development: for those with research centers in schools or those that aspire to create research centers to drive professional development. 


-McCarron, Margaret (American School of Bombay)

  • Spanish teacher with an interest in ELL: this discussion will focus on the topic of how to develop a highly articulated Modern Language program that is proficiency-based.  The guiding questions include:
    --What do highly-articulated and proficiency-based mean?
    --What implications do they have for curriculum design and assessment?
    --What are the roadblocks to proficiency-based Modern Language programs?
    --What is the difference between thematic and topical units?
    --And how can teaching thematic units of curriculum support a proficiency-based program?
    --How can ELL program structures inform the development of a proficiency-based Modern Languages program?

-
Nicolaou, Andreas (International School of London)
  • For heads/chairs of EAL/ESL:
    Should we be providing EAL or CLIL instruction?
    How do you decide if a student is ready for mainstream classes?
    What kind of in-class support do you provide?
    How do you work with Mother Tongue teachers?
    How do you track progress?

-Papadaki, Eugenia (The Bilingual School of Monza)
  • The role of administrators in establishing a positive school ethos conducive to
    multilingual practices and behaviours.What are our challenges and success stories?
  • Through group discussion we are going to collaboratively problem solve ,
    share, learn and celebrate! Please bring your own success stories and
    challenges to this session and be ready to share with concrete and concise
    examples.

-Petree, Samantha (American School of Bombay)
  • Coaching- for ESL teachers who are also instructional coaches at their school. Guiding questions will be: What is the coaching model used at your school? How does your coaching impact the teaching and learning of ELLs in content classes? How do you effectively work with content teachers to support best practices of ESL teaching?


-van Tongeren, Saskia (International School of Brussels)

  • An after-school Home Language programme in International Schools: topics include:
  • -The benefits & challenges of an after-school home language programme versus a home language programme as part of the day
  • -How will the school's curriculum be transferred to the after-school programme and vice versa?
  • -Which teaching practices and approaches will resonate best with the students?
  • -How do international schools organise a Home Language after school programme ( costs, differentiation, teaching styles and competing with less academic activities offered after school)?


Saturday March 4, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Pjerrot

12:30

Round Table
Round-table: these sessions focus on discussion for educators with a common topic of interest chaired by an expert or practitioner, and based on the chair's or participants' guiding questions. You can choose which discussion you would like to join on the day in the assigned venue.


Discussion leaders (and notes):

-Bekhechi, Frances with Veronica Bourke (International School of Brussels)
  • Practices and Approaches: Looking at case studies of second language students who struggle and determining how best to support their learning.

-Botcharova, Susan (Haileybury Almaty)
  • Multilingual education is a wonderful thing - but what to do when some of the stakeholders in your school don't see it that way? This round-table conversation will focus on this interesting and challenging question. How to deal with the cultural, social (and possibly political) issues which may arise when the details of multilingual language instruction are more closely examined will be the topic of discussion, with the examples from the Haileybury School in Almaty, used to demonstrate how challenging this can be. Although this issue touches on all aspects of school life, it will be framed within the ''Culture and Identity'' sub-theme. 

-
Caputo, Lorna (IS Zug & Luzern, Switzerland)
  • International schools have significant populations of multilingual children with complex language and educational histories due to families’ often-frequent relocations. This round table will explore some of the unique characteristics of high socio-economic, transient, multilingual children by posing discussion questions that come from recent sociolinguistic research on language variation and exposure, as well as psycho- and clinical-linguistic research. We will discuss how international educators work with families and clinicians to diagnose language disorders in multilingual children, as well as highlight the various factors that can contribute to both over-and under-identification of language disorders in this group. In addition, we will analyse the role of teachers in supporting the needs of multilingual children with suspected language disorders, and the many professional challenges they face. Many of the speakers you have selected for the conference have researched or recently presented papers and published articles on topics that deal with multilingualism and language development. I believe that a round table that addresses multilingual children and the topic of language disorder identification and support will provide attendees with a forum to reflect on this nuanced issue. 

-Dumic, Mirela (IS London, Surrey)
  • Connecting Students to the World of Research:   As an innovative initiative that gives interested Grade 8 and 9 students the opportunity to conduct cutting edge research, the Research Institute at the ISL Surrey has started a pilot research project. The project focuses on Bilingualism / Multilingualism, a key area of strength and expertise within its school community. Engaging with an academic researcher as a role model/mentor and two research facilitators from the school, the students will experience the whole process of conducting a research project. The students will produce an article for inclusion in a relevant publication and present their research findings to various audiences. The aim of the session is to share this experience and discuss potential of such initiatives in the context of an international school, and how they may empower the student. Research Institute 

- Dr. Feinmann, Jenny
  • This session will focus on assessment and intervention practices to encourage the academic language development of multilingual students. My doctoral research was a multiple case-study looking at the background factors affecting the spoken academic language development of adolescent International School students. This work drew on 25 years of experience working in International Schools in Europe and South-East Asia as a teacher and educational psychologist. It includes the longitudinal study of students from Grades 5-12. The proposed discussion relates to the ‘language needs or special needs’ question which was the particularly popular Teachers for Teachers session at the last ECIS ESLMT conference. Topics for this Round- table might be: Language needs or special needs? How do we assess whether students have had the opportunity to develop AL in any language? What is the place of home language development alongside the targeted instruction of academic language in the primary language(s) of schools?

-Kan, Christopher (Bavarian International School)
  • Who said learning shouldn't be fun? A lower affective filter, often an aspect of fun activities, can promote learning (Krashen, 1981).The aim of my session is to explore different experiential learning activities that are not only effective for supporting EAL students but are also fun. I hope to share a few ideas, engage my participants in thinking of ways to improve and adapt these ideas for their own teaching contexts.

-
Schmitt, Jennifer (Inter-Community School Zurich)
  • Face, pride, and ego: Conflict resolution in a multicultural context:  this session would be broader and more conceptual – it would include potential conflict resolution issues amongst staff, students, and parents as impacted by our various sets of cultural norms in an international school setting.  The focus is more on multicultural interactions and less on curriculum/instruction. Supporting slides available on this link.

-Smith, Graham (The EAL Academy)
  • Assessment & accountability: this discussion will focus on promoting raising the achievement of bilingual learners through:
    -the power of formative and summative assessment to provoke positive teacher conversation about learners and pedagogy
    -the power of accountability measures (such as inspection and performance data) to raise expectations of achievement for bilingual learners 

-
Stewart, Susan (IS London, Surrey)
  • This discussion will focus on the possibility of setting up a network of schools who actively support mother tongue within the curriculum. Could such a network regularly share their practices with one another and also provide information for our exiting families who are seeking a school with similar mother tongue support? Could we dream big, and imagine having a recognised "stamp of approval" of a "mother tongue/home language expert school"? 

Zwart, Henk (LanguageOne)
  • Teachers of the "host country" language in international schools face unique challenges in creating and delivering a high-quality program. Some of these are:
    - varying levels of proficiency in groups, from beginner to native speaker
    - varying levels of parental interest and support
    - lack of curricula and materials for this particular target group
    In this round table we will gather to brainstorm how "host country" teachers can work within these issues, and perhaps form collaborative partnerships for further development. 




Saturday March 4, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
Columbine

13:15

Transition
Saturday March 4, 2017 13:15 - 13:30
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

13:30

Applied Linguistics Project (ALP): Data-driven Student Inquiry into Mother Tongue (Texts & Corpora) and its Role in Learning
Limited Capacity seats available

In ALP, high school students (aged 14-16) inquire into their MT and learning by doing linguistic research: from formulating a research question + hypothesis about their learning in MT and Academic English, through developing a method of testing their hypothesis by collecting experimental or corpus linguistics data, to analyzing the results and applying them to their own learning in a presentation at a student conference at Charles University in Prague (in front of a panel of experts). They summarize their findings in an academic paper published in a proceedings book.

  • Aims and outcomes/evidence (if any)

Aims: To promote evidence based reflection on the role and importance of MT in learning.

Outcomes: Student presentations (videos and ppts), papers (proceedings book), and reflections (electronic surveys); => case studies on how using MT texts & corpora in learning can improve understanding, as well as data on how MT skills & identity are influenced by international education in L2. [word count: 150]

Footnote:

This (ALP) project is in its fourth year now (2016-17). We have published about ALP in peer-reviewed publications (one example: https://research-publishing.net/display_article.php?doi=10.14705/rpnet.2015.000311 or here). Interestingly, this project was inspired by Jim Cummins' presentation at the 2011 ECIS ESLMT Conference in Dusseldorf, Germany.

You can follow presentation slides here.



Moderators
avatar for Paul Magnuson

Paul Magnuson

Director of Research and Curriculum, Leysin American School
Paul is the Director of Research and Curriculum at Leysin American School in Switzerland. In addition, he oversees LASER (LAS Educational Research) as well as the newly launched Middle School program. Paul is deeply interested in student-centered, self-regulated learning via an Agile... Read More →

Speakers

Saturday March 4, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Pjerrot

13:30

Developing Multi-literacy: Using Thinking Routines and Technology Tools for assessment and accountability in Secondary classrooms
Limited Capacity filling up

Examples of student work and student reflections

How can Secondary teachers measure students’ understanding beyond tests and essays? Assessment in many Secondary classrooms requires a high level of English proficiency many English language learners have not acquired, preventing these students the means to participate actively in class and demonstrate their learning. Using multimodal tools, this project seeks to create culturally inclusive classrooms that document students’ thinking and learning through the use of Harvard University’s visible thinking routines and various technology tools. The presenter will share students’ learning from English as an Additional Language classrooms and Content classes. Participants will engage in workshop activities that explore thinking routines and technology tools they can use in their schools to engage and assess English language learners.



Moderators
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Paul Kei Matsuda

Paul Kei Matsuda

Professor of English, Arizona State University
Paul Kei Matsuda is Professor of English and Director of Second Language Writing at Arizona State University, where he works closely with doctoral students specializing in second language writing from various disciplinary perspectives. Paul is Founding Chair of the Symposium on... Read More →

Speakers

Saturday March 4, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Columbine

13:30

Macalin kayga qaaliga / My dear teacher: Considerations for Teaching Refugee Learners
Limited Capacity seats available

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that at the end of 2015 an unprecedented 65.3 million people were displaced from their homes, forced as a result of war and persecution to seek protection elsewhere.  Half of those displaced were children.  

The global impact of this mass displacement has brought about new challenges to societies participating in refugee resettlement. One important area of concern in many of the resettlement countries is the education of students with limited or interrupted formal education or SLIFE.  Years of migration and/or years of residence in refugee camps have resulted in limited access to formal schooling for many refugee students, and it is the educational needs of these students that this proposal seeks to address.  

More here


Moderators
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Laura Vander Broek

Laura Vander Broek

Associate Professor of English, Grand Valley State University
Laura Vander Broek is an Associate Professor of English at Grand Valley State University in Michigan where she serves as Linguistics Section Chair for the undergraduate curriculum in Applied Linguistics. She has been a Fulbright Scholar in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Chiapas, Mexico.  Her... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Cullip

Sarah Cullip

Undergraduate Student, Grand Valley State University
I am currently a senior undergraduate student pursuing degrees in English and German Secondary Education. I recently completed an ESL Teaching Practicum with Professor Laura Vander Broek, during which I taught English to a recently resettled refugee family of 8 Somali women - a mother... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Blomstersalen

13:30

Multilingualism: A Whole Community Project
Limited Capacity filling up

Susan Stewart, Head of Languages at the International School of London (Surrey), presents regular workshops entitled ‘Raising your Bilingual Child’.  These workshops are open to parents, extended family and school staff, as well as external professionals and parents from the local community.  The workshops aim to dispel the many common myths surrounding bilingualism, and deliver a clear message on how to ensure that the process of acquiring two or more languages simultaneously should be a natural and positive process for all. As an international school, with 17 mother tongue languages taught as part of the curriculum, ISL Surrey has become a valuable community hub which supports bilingualism, given the lack of such provision in local state and private schools.

The aim of this session is to highlight the importance of creating a shared understanding of the process of language acquisition and resulting multilingualism.  It is when schools work in partnership with families, that we ensure that the benefits derived from exposure to different languages are maximised.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPRvI71xNDI&noredirect=1

Moderators
avatar for Eowyn Crisfield

Eowyn Crisfield

Academic Development, LanguageOne
I am a specialist in multilingual/bilingual education, including language learning in schools (EAL/ELL) and mother tongue. I have been working in national and international schools as a consultant for EAL/ELL programming and professional development, Languages across the curriculum... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Susan Stewart

Susan Stewart

ECIS MLIE Chair, International School of London
Susan Stewart is Multilingualism Lead at the International School of London, where she works with a department of Home Language, Language Acquisition and English as an Additional Language teachers. Susan has lived and worked in Thailand, the UAE, South Africa, Belgium, Oman and Sweden... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Harlekin

13:30

Preaching to the Non-Converted! - How to Develop and ‘Sell’ the Benefits of Multilingual Classrooms to Others and Work Towards a Global Educational Approach in Your School
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will be led and supported by Catherine Copeland, an educational consultant with a school leadership background (Director of Global EDGEucation) and Jane Fox, a Mother Tongue Coordinator ( ACS Egham International School) who are working together to develop a sustainable approach towards Multilingual classrooms within a global educational context.


Moderators
avatar for Carol Gaab

Carol Gaab

iFLT Director, Fluency Matters
Fluency Matters offers an expansive selection of comprehension-based readers specifically designed to facilitate acquisition. Stories are written with a manageable number of unique words, making them highly comprehensible, even to novice-level learners. We offer the widest selection... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Copeland

Catherine Copeland

Director, Global EDGEucation, Cameron International Primary School
I am a Canadian living in Spain, working internationally. I do consultancy work on topics related to developing global perspectives. I have a particular interest in language and multilingual classrooms, as well as building language policies to reflect developments in this area. I... Read More →
avatar for Jane Fox

Jane Fox

Mother Tongue Coordinator, ACS Egham International School
Advocacy for inclusive educational approach to Mother Tongue and Heritage Languages in global school community is my passion. I am also responsible for our school's after school Mother Tongue/ Heritage Language programme and the mentorship and training of its 23 tutors. I am continuously... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Lumbye

13:30

Supporting English Language Learners with Different Learning Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will focus on methods of supporting students with special needs within language learning classrooms. Often times it is challenging to identify whether a learning disability is present when a learner is acquiring an additional language. This project will highlight several case studies of students learning English and experiencing difficulties socially and academically.  The emphasis will be on utilizing culturally-competent strategies for collaborating with families and school professionals to clarify a student's strengths as well as needs. The session will share examples of strengths-based approaches which successfully supported individuals and families within international schools.

The aims of this session are to:

- explore  the meaning and relevance of cultural competence

- share strategy models for collaborative practices with families

- discern how to implement support based on the learner’s social and academic background

Moderators
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Melissa McDonald

Melissa McDonald

Lifelong Learning
Melissa McDonald is an international special educator and presenter with twenty years of experience in working with children, families, schools, and conferences around the world. Melissa is a workshop leader for the IB and currently serves as the Chair of the ECIS Early Childhood... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Carstensen

14:30

Afternoon Break
Saturday March 4, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

15:00

Applying the Academic Language of Science to Lesson and Unit Planning
Limited Capacity filling up

Using science as an example, this workshop applies information about academic language of a subject to lesson and unit planning. Participants will explore vocabulary, reading and writing techniques that can be used in an ESL or mother tongue classrooms to build science language or in science classes to support students’ academic language development. A lesson template and a unit template will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Deborah Short

Dr. Deborah Short

Academic Language Research & Training
Deborah J. Short, PhD, directs Academic Language Research & Training, LLC and provides professional development on academic literacy, content­-based ESL, and sheltered instruction worldwide. Formerly she was a division director at the Center for Applied Linguistics where she co-developed... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Harlekin

15:00

Multicultural Classrooms: The Power to Extend and Expand Learning
Limited Capacity filling up

Using a multicultural curriculum reform framework, we look at ways in which academic content learning can link with the communities that an international school serves. Critical connections can be made with students’ home lives that would benefit not only multicultural learning but would also reinforce and extend content area concepts learned at school. Creating multicultural classrooms can be achieved by making cross-cultural and home-school connections in four steps that are increasingly complex: 1) studying the contributions that famous people from a group have made; 2) inserting topics/themes that are part of students’ backgrounds into the curriculum; 3) changing the basic structure of the curriculum to allow students to consider different perspectives; 4) expanding learning in significant ways by having students take social action in their own communities.

Speakers
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Columbine

15:00

Teacher-Driven PD for Your School
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective professional development is collaborative, classroom-based,
ongoing, and includes a healthy dose of teacher autonomy and self-
direction. The good news is that these factors are compatible with pd
created by teachers, for teachers. In this session, we’ll explore examples
of three pd models you can implement to support quality teaching in the
language programs at your school, whether you are a new or veteran
teacher … or administrator: (1) a model based on observations of
colleagues and oneself, (2) a model based on comparison of student
feedback with teacher perception, and (3) a model based on the teacher
as researcher.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Magnuson

Paul Magnuson

Director of Research and Curriculum, Leysin American School
Paul is the Director of Research and Curriculum at Leysin American School in Switzerland. In addition, he oversees LASER (LAS Educational Research) as well as the newly launched Middle School program. Paul is deeply interested in student-centered, self-regulated learning via an Agile... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Blomstersalen

15:00

The Power of Assessment as and for Learning in Multilingual Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Assessment can be a powerful instructional and learning tool when its primary users, namely students and teachers, are given a voice in the decision-making process. In assessment as learning, students have input in the design or implementation of classroom-based measures; language learners set learning goals, co-construct criteria of success, and engage in self-assessment. In assessment for learning, teachers are encouraged to co-plan with students, provide targeted feedback, and use data to refine their practice. This presentation centers on strategies for facilitating stakeholder engagement in assessment as and for learning in multilingual classrooms in international contexts.  

Speakers
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Pjerrot

15:00

Theory and Practice in Comprehension-Based Classrooms: Popup Theory
Limited Capacity seats available

Audience: Middle school and high school second/foreign language

Abstract: Research over the last few decades shows that grammar study has no impact on developing communicative competence. Rather, we develop the ability to use language by exposure to comprehensible and interesting input. 

Grammatical rules are at best inconsistent and unreliable, which makes the term “rule” a misnomer all together.  Consistently ambiguous, grammar rules are extremely difficult to learn and nearly impossible to apply with any level of reliability or accuracy, and more importantly, they are a distraction from the real purpose of language classes.   

There are, however, a number of instances when conscious knowledge of grammar can help: It can be of service in editing, and may occasionally help language acquirers better understand messages. It can also serve as an introduction to Linguistics. 

One way to introduce grammar in a way consistent with its uses and limitations is through "pop-up grammar," occasional explanations of selected aspects of grammar that take little time (sometimes less than a minute). We present some examples, classroom video clips and student reactions. 

Speakers
avatar for Carol Gaab

Carol Gaab

iFLT Director, Fluency Matters
Fluency Matters offers an expansive selection of comprehension-based readers specifically designed to facilitate acquisition. Stories are written with a manageable number of unique words, making them highly comprehensible, even to novice-level learners. We offer the widest selection... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Krashen

Stephen Krashen

榮譽教授 Professor Emeritus, 南加州大學 University of Southern California
Dr. Stephen Krashen, Professor Emeritus of USC (University of Southern California) has published more than 300 papers as a linguistic researcher. He is most famously known for his Theory of SLA, which includes 5 hypotheses: Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Lumbye

15:00

Why Choose To Be Multilingual and Multicultural?
Limited Capacity seats available

Alex Rawlings was brought up in London by an English father and half-Greek mother. In this breakout session, he will draw on his personal experiences to discuss the challenges that having a multilingual and multicultural background can bring. He will also examine how these difficulties may have grown greater in today’s world. He will stress the value of a diverse upbringing, and explain why he eventually chose to embrace both his cultural backgrounds, along with many more through learning multiple languages, and why he would still choose to do so every time.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Rawlings

Alex Rawlings

Alex was born and raised in London to a half-Greek mother and English father. As a child he spent his time between the UK, Greece and Japan, where his father worked for four years. Having always been surrounded by languages, he began to study them independently aged 14. In 2012, while... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00
Carstensen

16:00

Transition
Saturday March 4, 2017 16:00 - 16:10
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

16:10

Engagement and Participation in Multilingual Classrooms: Implications for Teaching and Learning
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the challenges for teachers in multilingual classrooms, where English is the primary medium of education, is to meet the English language needs of students for whom English is a second (or subsequent) language, while at the same time building on those students’ prior knowledge, lived experiences and language. At the same time, we need to take into account that educational outcomes for all students are likely to be increased when they are engaged in an intellectually challenging curriculum. To be successful learners, therefore, all students need planned, targeted and ongoing support to meet the language, literacy and learning demands of all areas of the curriculum.


In this talk I will focus on four areas of classroom practice that illustrate how language and literacy can be integrated with subject learning, within an interactive and intellectually challenging curriculum. The engagement and participation of students is central to these practices. Drawing on classroom examples, I will suggest that, through the kinds of scaffolding they provide, teachers can support all students in the development of the academic language and literacies of school.

Speakers
avatar for Pauline Gibbons

Pauline Gibbons

Pauline Gibbons is an Adjunct Professor at the University of New South Wales Australia, where she teaches courses in teaching English as a second language. Her work with teachers has taken her to Hong Kong, Sweden, Laos, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, China, South Africa, Marshall... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 16:10 - 17:10
Congress Hall

17:10

End of the day Plenary
Saturday March 4, 2017 17:10 - 17:40
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

17:30

Afternoon Consultations (by appointment only)
Consultations will occur at the allocated time and location AS WELL AS additional times TBD. Sign up and more information will be available at the Registration Desk.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →
avatar for Niki Cooper

Niki Cooper

ELL Coordinator K-12, UWCSEA Maastricht
Niki Cooper is the ELL Coordinator (K-12) at UWC Maastricht. Previous roles include Home Language Coordinator and primary school Vice-Principal. She holds a Masters in Applied Linguistics and English Language teaching. Responsible for designing and coordinating the whole school ELL... Read More →
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Paul Magnuson

Paul Magnuson

Director of Research and Curriculum, Leysin American School
Paul is the Director of Research and Curriculum at Leysin American School in Switzerland. In addition, he oversees LASER (LAS Educational Research) as well as the newly launched Middle School program. Paul is deeply interested in student-centered, self-regulated learning via an Agile... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →
avatar for Eugenia Papadaki

Eugenia Papadaki

Founding Director, The Bilingual Schoolof Monza
Eugenia Papadaki has been the founding director of a Bilingual school for the past 21 years. She is the mother of two trilingual children from birth.She holds a B.A in Modern Foreign languages, an M.A in Applied Linguistics and a PGCE. She has taught extensively in all sectors of... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →
avatar for Antonella Sorace

Antonella Sorace

Professor of Developmental Linguistics, University of Edinburgh & BILINGUALISM MATTERS
Antonella Sorace is Professor of Developmental Linguistics at the University ofEdinburgh. She is a world leading authority in the field of bilingual languagedevelopment across the lifespan, where she brings together methods fromlinguistics, experimental psychology, and cognitive science... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 17:30 - 18:30
Harlekin

18:30

Boat Tour and Dinner (only for people who have pre-registered and paid)

We will meet in the front entrance of the Tivoli Hotel at 18:15. Then as a group we will walk a short distance to the nearby harbor. At 18:30, our transportation (a canal boat) will depart. We will have a guided, night tour of Copenhagen for one hour.

At around 19:30 the canal boat will drops us off at one of the coziest places to eat at in Copenhagen, Papirøen. 

Copenhagen Street Food on Papirøen (Paper Island) in Copenhagen is the city's first and only genuine street food market. In the small food trucks you can get delicious sustainable street food from all corners of the world overlooking the city's waterfront. There is something very Copenhagen-like and something very foreign about Copenhagen Street Food. There are scents of Korean and Mexican as well as Italian and Danish food from the small colourful food trucks, but the place has a distinct Copenhagen feel to it.

There are food trucks, coffee, beers, and drinks. Some food trucks serve organic food, but the priority is that the food tastes good, is made from scratch, and it must be sustainable, meaning for an example that the ingredients are not transported over long distances, but are local produce. "Genuine, honest and aesthetic" is the motto.

Please check out more information about Copenhagen Street Food on Papirøen here.  

Each participant will receive some vouchers to use and buy their own food and drink from the many food stalls (around 20). In addition to the vouchers, you will also get some complimentary drinks (a welcome drink + some wine). 

We will have a reserved spot for our whole group to eat, chat and network. We have the reserved spot for two hours.

At around 21:20 we will make our way back to catch our canal boat back to the hotel which leaves at 21:30, no tour this time. We should arrive back at the hotel at around 22:00 if not sooner.


Saturday March 4, 2017 18:30 - 22:00
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V
 
Sunday, March 5
 

08:30

Consultations (by appointment only)
Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →
avatar for Niki Cooper

Niki Cooper

ELL Coordinator K-12, UWCSEA Maastricht
Niki Cooper is the ELL Coordinator (K-12) at UWC Maastricht. Previous roles include Home Language Coordinator and primary school Vice-Principal. She holds a Masters in Applied Linguistics and English Language teaching. Responsible for designing and coordinating the whole school ELL... Read More →
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Paul Magnuson

Paul Magnuson

Director of Research and Curriculum, Leysin American School
Paul is the Director of Research and Curriculum at Leysin American School in Switzerland. In addition, he oversees LASER (LAS Educational Research) as well as the newly launched Middle School program. Paul is deeply interested in student-centered, self-regulated learning via an Agile... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →
avatar for Eugenia Papadaki

Eugenia Papadaki

Founding Director, The Bilingual Schoolof Monza
Eugenia Papadaki has been the founding director of a Bilingual school for the past 21 years. She is the mother of two trilingual children from birth.She holds a B.A in Modern Foreign languages, an M.A in Applied Linguistics and a PGCE. She has taught extensively in all sectors of... Read More →
avatar for Beth Skelton

Beth Skelton

Consultant, Educational Consultants, LLC
Beth strives to take language learning to new heights because she believes that all students are academic language learners. She has been working in education for over 30 years, and her primary goal is to support schools around the globe in their quest to provide equitable education... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 08:30 - 09:00
Harlekin

09:00

Multilingualism in the Classroom: “I think it’s helping my brain grow”
Limited Capacity seats available

The quotation in the title of this presentation comes from Manaan, a grade 6 student in Floradale Public School in the Greater Toronto Area, as he reflected on the experience of reading, retelling, and creating books in his two languages, English and Hindi. This bilingual experience came about as a result of the multilingual approach to literacy development initiated by the teacher librarian in the school. Drawing on multiple classroom examples such as this, the presentation will describe how we can progress from an orientation of ‘benign neglect’ in relation to students’ languages in the multilingual classroom to a proactive orientation that mobilizes students’ languages as cognitive tools in the service of inquiry, literacy engagement, and intercultural exploration. The presentation will also highlight the reasons why we should move in this direction—reasons that include more effective teaching of academic content, cognitive enhancement, greater language awareness, student identity affirmation, as well as expansion of our own identities as educators.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Cummins

Jim Cummins

Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto
Jim Cummins is a Professor Emeritus at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. His research focuses on literacy development in educational contexts characterized by linguistic diversity. In numerous articles and books he has explored the nature... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 09:00 - 10:15
Congress Hall

10:15

Morning Break
There will be a light snack during this time in the common areas next to the exhibitors.

Sunday March 5, 2017 10:15 - 10:45
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V

10:45

Mother Tongue at the Center: Using Structured Translanguaging in the International Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Globally, there is an increasing focus on the critical role a child’s mother tongue/home language plays in cognitive and linguistic development. It has also become a growing concern in international schools, with new research supporting the need for international schools to improve or develop provisions to ensure that all students continue using their mother tongue for learning at school, in systemic and systematic ways.

The issue for international schools then, is not if they should support the mother tongue languages of their students, but a more complex how should they support them. Given the diverse and super-diverse nature of most international schools, this question has no easy answer. An area of research and practice that has been increasingly of interest in this discussion is translanguaging. Bringing translanguaging into the spotlight as an ideology of multilingualism is a step forward in understanding normative multilingual practices, but bringing it into the classroom as a vehicle for integrating mother tongue languages requires more than ideology. This session will look at the practical aspects of planning for translanguaging in international schools, in particular looking at the structures of the PYP as a framework for understanding effective translanguaging pedagogy. Participants will leave will a clear vision of why we should translanguage in international schools, as well as how we plan for effective use in the classroom. 


Speakers
avatar for Eowyn Crisfield

Eowyn Crisfield

Academic Development, LanguageOne
I am a specialist in multilingual/bilingual education, including language learning in schools (EAL/ELL) and mother tongue. I have been working in national and international schools as a consultant for EAL/ELL programming and professional development, Languages across the curriculum... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Blomstersalen

10:45

Multilingual Classrooms and Regional Languages: Practices and Approaches for the Maintenance of Linguistic Diversity
Limited Capacity seats available

The education system has a crucial role to play in the potential maintenance of regional and minority languages, with education providing an important locus of language transmission as well as a crucial contribution to status planning. However, it is well known that introducing a language in education is not a sufficient condition for successful maintenance of that language. Moreover, as the level and complexity of language planning operations has increased in the last decades, unforeseen consequences are beginning to surface, giving rise to new challenges in language planning and the role of educational practice. This paper discusses the impact of top-down minority language transmission and the potential side effects of formal domain dependency as a consequence of over-reliance on education as the locus of transmission. Using qualitative and quantitative data from adolescent speakers of Welsh (both first language and fluent second language speakers), I discuss how top-down formal-domain transmission has impacted attitudes towards Welsh and potentially inhibits language application among adolescents. Alternative approaches and potential solutions will also be discussed and evaluated.

Speakers
avatar for Marco Tamburelli

Marco Tamburelli

Reader in Bilingualism, Bangor University
Marco Tamburelli is a Reader in Bilingualism at Bangor University where he works on simultaneous bilingualism and teaches a variety of courses in bilingual acquisition, bilingual phonology, and language contact phenomena. He obtained a PhD from University College London where he researched... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Harlekin

10:45

New Tools for Teaching and Learning in Multilingual Classrooms
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Academic language development and achievement of language learners is best supported when it is couched within a cohesive standards-referenced system. At WIDA, the heart of the system is an assets-based approach to planning, instruction, assessment, and reflection. In identifying key uses of academic language (discuss, argue, recount, explain), teachers can recognize what learners can do as they develop disciplinary language practices. In this session, participants will explore a set of tools revolving around  key uses of academic language, and consider how they can be applied to classrooms in international schools.  

Speakers
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Pjerrot

10:45

Partnering with Non English-Speaking Families: Enriching Multilingual Pedagogy
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will focus on the importance of developing and nurturing partnerships with the growing number of non English-speaking families whose young children attend International Schools. Using the portraiture framework (Lawrence-Lightfoot and Davis, 1997; Lawrence-Lightfoot, 2005; Hackman, 2002) and the “funds of knowledge” approach (Moll, Amanti, Neff, and González, 1992) a language and literacy portrait of non English-speaking families will be presented. Guided by the question “What is good here?” the portrait describes the language and literacy richness of non English-speaking families, explaining how their classroom participation brings linguistic diversity to life and how they can help foster international understanding, international mindedness and inter-lingual awareness in all children. To help teachers connect with non English-speaking families, a new partnering framework is introduced and explained. Field-tested strategies for creating and nurturing partnerships will be shared and discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Roma Chumak Horbatsch

Roma Chumak Horbatsch

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
Dr. Roma Chumak-Horbatsch is Associate Professor in the School of Early Childhood Studies at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, where she teaches courses in language development, cognitive development and childhood bilingualism. She has a background in applied linguistics and... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Carstensen

10:45

Supporting Bi/Multilingual Children Who Struggle: Moving from Oral Fluency to Academic Language Proficiency
Limited Capacity filling up

International schools are reporting increasing numbers of students who are orally proficient in two or more languages but struggle with the acquisition of literacy in the language of instruction of the school.  Students who are literate in their primary language can generally transfer these skills successfully to other languages.  But what if this is not the case?  How do schools plan appropriate support to move them along the continuum from spoken to written English?  

Speakers
avatar for Frances Bekhechi

Frances Bekhechi

Initially a teacher of modern languages in the UK, Frances Bekhechi moved into the field of ESL when the family took up residence in Brussels in the early 80's. She subsequently taught at the International School of Brussels for 24 years, working with children in K - 6th grade, before... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Bourke

Veronica Bourke

Learning Support Head, ISB
Veronica Bourke is the elementary school Head of Learning Support at the International School of Brussels, Belgium. She has been an international school teacher for more than 25 years and has a strong interest and passion for understanding the learning profiles of ESL students who... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Lumbye

10:45

The Glitterlings in Interlingual Early Years Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

What kind of people are we educating?

Children need to understand from an early age that being a polyglot is not only a desirable outcome of education but also an achievable one. The building blocks for a better world must be seeded in Early Years.  We must enable children to see themselves as agents of change, capable of understanding world views.  Openness to other languages is essential.

In this session I will introduce The Glitterlings – a series of nine stories for the Early Years that develops biliteracy engagement, a positive sense of self and creates an affective bond between child and books. We will consider how parents can become co-educators in this process.

‘The Glitterlings is a unique resource because it helps young children begin the journey towards national, international and intercultural-mindedness, empowering them with the skills they will need to play their part on the plurilingual and pluricultural global stage.’
John Dabell

You can read more endorsements for The Glitterlings here: http://www.eithnegallagher.net/glitterlings.htm

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45
Columbine

11:45

Transition
Sunday March 5, 2017 11:45 - 12:00
Congress Hall

12:00

Panel Discussion
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Jim Cummins

Jim Cummins

Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto
Jim Cummins is a Professor Emeritus at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. His research focuses on literacy development in educational contexts characterized by linguistic diversity. In numerous articles and books he has explored the nature... Read More →
avatar for Fred Genesee

Fred Genesee

Professor Emeritus, McGill University
Fred Genesee is Professor Emeritus in the Psychology , McGill University. He has conducted extensive research on alternative forms of bilingual/ immersion education for language minority and majority students, the academic development of at-risk students in bilingual programs. language... Read More →
avatar for Pauline Gibbons

Pauline Gibbons

Pauline Gibbons is an Adjunct Professor at the University of New South Wales Australia, where she teaches courses in teaching English as a second language. Her work with teachers has taken her to Hong Kong, Sweden, Laos, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, China, South Africa, Marshall... Read More →
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Krashen

Stephen Krashen

榮譽教授 Professor Emeritus, 南加州大學 University of Southern California
Dr. Stephen Krashen, Professor Emeritus of USC (University of Southern California) has published more than 300 papers as a linguistic researcher. He is most famously known for his Theory of SLA, which includes 5 hypotheses: Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis... Read More →
avatar for Paul Kei Matsuda

Paul Kei Matsuda

Professor of English, Arizona State University
Paul Kei Matsuda is Professor of English and Director of Second Language Writing at Arizona State University, where he works closely with doctoral students specializing in second language writing from various disciplinary perspectives. Paul is Founding Chair of the Symposium on... Read More →
avatar for Alex Rawlings

Alex Rawlings

Alex was born and raised in London to a half-Greek mother and English father. As a child he spent his time between the UK, Greece and Japan, where his father worked for four years. Having always been surrounded by languages, he began to study them independently aged 14. In 2012, while... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 12:00 - 12:45
Congress Hall

12:45

Closing Ceremony
Sunday March 5, 2017 12:45 - 13:00
Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center Arni Magnussons Gade 2, 1577 København V