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ECIS ESLMT Conference Copenhagen (2-5 March, 2017)
"The Power of Multilingual Classrooms in International Education: Implications for Curriculum Design, Teaching and Learning" 

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Breakout Session [clear filter]
Friday, March 3
 

10:45 CET

Inspiring Higher-order Thinking Using Level-appropriate Language
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Comprehensible Input is the key to facilitating language acquisition, and compelling input is the key to maintaining student engagement. Learn how to keep input comprehensibly compelling and how to simultaneously enhance acquisition by inspiring students to use high-order thinking skills– in the Target Language! Discover practical, yet powerful strategies that will naturally facilitate acquisition in a pleasant, engaging and impactful way, regardless of the level of the learner. Become a pro at sparking HOT using low-level/level-appropriate language!

Speakers
avatar for Fluency Matters

Fluency Matters

Carol Gaab, President / iFLT Director, Fluency Matters
Fluency Matters offers an expansive selection of comprehension-based readers specifically designed to facilitate acquisition. Stories are written with a manageable number of unique words, making them highly comprehensible, even to novice-level learners. We offer the widest selection... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45 CET
Harlekin

10:45 CET

Opening Boundries: A Conversation on Crosslanguage Pedagogies in Multilingual Classrooms
Limited Capacity filling up

Students in international schools have a great diversity of language and cultural backgrounds.
There has been ongoing discussion of how and how not to use and support the language
development of students who do not speak the main language of instruction, English in many
cases. Most recently, arguments have been made based on research on bilingual language
acquisition, education, and sociolinguistics to make greater use of all the linguistic resources of
students even in monolingual classrooms. In this session, we will discuss those arguments and
then consider the pros and cons of using students’ native languages during otherwise
monolingual instruction. We will describe strategies for using crosslanguage pedagogies that
optimize student learning and engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Fred Genesee

Fred Genesee

Professor Emeritus, McGill University
Fred Genesee is Professor Emeritus in the Psychology , McGill University. He has conducted extensive research on alternative forms of bilingual/ immersion education for language minority and majority students, the academic development of at-risk students in bilingual programs. language... Read More →
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45 CET
Columbine

10:45 CET

Translanguaging in the Secondary School
Limited Capacity seats available

When Second Language Students join international schools at the secondary level without well developed academic English ability, they face enormous  challenges.  Outside of their ESL classes, they are faced continually with English at a high academic level in all subject areas.

How can we help them to access the curriculum content, increase their level of understanding and at the same time show that we appreciate and value their mother tongues?

How can we give their parents insight into what their children are actually learning?

Translanguaging opens up new opportunities for students (and their parents) in the twenty-first century - but of course we will still need the ESL and mother tongue  teachers!

 

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Mertin

Patricia Mertin

Retired, No affiliation
Patricia describes herself as a ‘reformed monolingual’. After starting her career as a music teacher in England, she moved to Germany to teach with the British Forces and here her monolingual life changed. She became a fluent speaker of German. With her German husband she raised... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 10:45 - 11:45 CET
Blomstersalen

15:00 CET

Multilingualism for All: What About At-Risk Learners?
Limited Capacity seats available

While there is ample evidence for the advantages of bi/multilingualism for typically-developing learners, parents and educators often express doubts about bilingualism and educating children with learning challenges in a second language. There is a growing body of research on the development of children with learning disabilities, including children with language and reading impairment, Down Syndrome, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Reading and language learning difficulties are the most common challenges faced by at-risk school age learners. Strategies and approaches for identifying and working with students who are at-risk for reading and/or language impairment and are learning through a second language will be discussed.  

Speakers
avatar for Fred Genesee

Fred Genesee

Professor Emeritus, McGill University
Fred Genesee is Professor Emeritus in the Psychology , McGill University. He has conducted extensive research on alternative forms of bilingual/ immersion education for language minority and majority students, the academic development of at-risk students in bilingual programs. language... Read More →


Friday March 3, 2017 15:00 - 16:00 CET
Lumbye
 
Saturday, March 4
 

15:00 CET

Multicultural Classrooms: The Power to Extend and Expand Learning
Limited Capacity filling up

Using a multicultural curriculum reform framework, we look at ways in which academic content learning can link with the communities that an international school serves. Critical connections can be made with students’ home lives that would benefit not only multicultural learning but would also reinforce and extend content area concepts learned at school. Creating multicultural classrooms can be achieved by making cross-cultural and home-school connections in four steps that are increasingly complex: 1) studying the contributions that famous people from a group have made; 2) inserting topics/themes that are part of students’ backgrounds into the curriculum; 3) changing the basic structure of the curriculum to allow students to consider different perspectives; 4) expanding learning in significant ways by having students take social action in their own communities.

Speakers
avatar for Else Hamayan

Else Hamayan

My first experience with multilingualism came at the age of 5 when my mother dropped me off at the “madrasat al rahbat” (the nuns’ school) in Baghdad. I discovered that I was the only one who spoke Armenian, and everyone else spoke something I couldn’t understand (turned out... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00 CET
Columbine

15:00 CET

The Power of Assessment as and for Learning in Multilingual Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Assessment can be a powerful instructional and learning tool when its primary users, namely students and teachers, are given a voice in the decision-making process. In assessment as learning, students have input in the design or implementation of classroom-based measures; language learners set learning goals, co-construct criteria of success, and engage in self-assessment. In assessment for learning, teachers are encouraged to co-plan with students, provide targeted feedback, and use data to refine their practice. This presentation centers on strategies for facilitating stakeholder engagement in assessment as and for learning in multilingual classrooms in international contexts.  

Speakers
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00 CET
Pjerrot

15:00 CET

Theory and Practice in Comprehension-Based Classrooms: Popup Theory
Limited Capacity seats available

Audience: Middle school and high school second/foreign language

Abstract: Research over the last few decades shows that grammar study has no impact on developing communicative competence. Rather, we develop the ability to use language by exposure to comprehensible and interesting input. 

Grammatical rules are at best inconsistent and unreliable, which makes the term “rule” a misnomer all together.  Consistently ambiguous, grammar rules are extremely difficult to learn and nearly impossible to apply with any level of reliability or accuracy, and more importantly, they are a distraction from the real purpose of language classes.   

There are, however, a number of instances when conscious knowledge of grammar can help: It can be of service in editing, and may occasionally help language acquirers better understand messages. It can also serve as an introduction to Linguistics. 

One way to introduce grammar in a way consistent with its uses and limitations is through "pop-up grammar," occasional explanations of selected aspects of grammar that take little time (sometimes less than a minute). We present some examples, classroom video clips and student reactions. 

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Krashen

Stephen Krashen

榮譽教授 Professor Emeritus, 南加州大學 University of Southern California
Dr. Stephen Krashen, Professor Emeritus of USC (University of Southern California) has published more than 300 papers as a linguistic researcher. He is most famously known for his Theory of SLA, which includes 5 hypotheses: Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis, the Input Hypothesis... Read More →
avatar for Fluency Matters

Fluency Matters

Carol Gaab, President / iFLT Director, Fluency Matters
Fluency Matters offers an expansive selection of comprehension-based readers specifically designed to facilitate acquisition. Stories are written with a manageable number of unique words, making them highly comprehensible, even to novice-level learners. We offer the widest selection... Read More →


Saturday March 4, 2017 15:00 - 16:00 CET
Lumbye
 
Sunday, March 5
 

10:45 CET

Mother Tongue at the Center: Using Structured Translanguaging in the International Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Globally, there is an increasing focus on the critical role a child’s mother tongue/home language plays in cognitive and linguistic development. It has also become a growing concern in international schools, with new research supporting the need for international schools to improve or develop provisions to ensure that all students continue using their mother tongue for learning at school, in systemic and systematic ways.

The issue for international schools then, is not if they should support the mother tongue languages of their students, but a more complex how should they support them. Given the diverse and super-diverse nature of most international schools, this question has no easy answer. An area of research and practice that has been increasingly of interest in this discussion is translanguaging. Bringing translanguaging into the spotlight as an ideology of multilingualism is a step forward in understanding normative multilingual practices, but bringing it into the classroom as a vehicle for integrating mother tongue languages requires more than ideology. This session will look at the practical aspects of planning for translanguaging in international schools, in particular looking at the structures of the PYP as a framework for understanding effective translanguaging pedagogy. Participants will leave will a clear vision of why we should translanguage in international schools, as well as how we plan for effective use in the classroom. 


Speakers
avatar for Eowyn Crisfield

Eowyn Crisfield

Academic Development, LanguageOne
I am a specialist in multilingual/bilingual education, including language learning in schools (EAL/ELL) and mother tongue. I have been working in national and international schools as a consultant for EAL/ELL programming and professional development, Languages across the curriculum... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45 CET
Blomstersalen

10:45 CET

New Tools for Teaching and Learning in Multilingual Classrooms
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Academic language development and achievement of language learners is best supported when it is couched within a cohesive standards-referenced system. At WIDA, the heart of the system is an assets-based approach to planning, instruction, assessment, and reflection. In identifying key uses of academic language (discuss, argue, recount, explain), teachers can recognize what learners can do as they develop disciplinary language practices. In this session, participants will explore a set of tools revolving around  key uses of academic language, and consider how they can be applied to classrooms in international schools.  

Speakers
avatar for Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb

Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., is co-founder and lead developer of WIDA at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, a consortium of 39 state education agencies in the US and 270 international schools worldwide. Over the last decade she has engaged in the... Read More →
avatar for Jon Nordmeyer

Jon Nordmeyer

RISS Invited Speaker, WIDA International
Jon Nordmeyer is WIDA's International Programs Director. Jon guides the research, development and implementation of WIDA resources to support English language learners in international schools. He comes to WIDA with more than 25 years of experience teaching at international schools... Read More →


Sunday March 5, 2017 10:45 - 11:45 CET
Pjerrot